• Wikimedia Australia Wikimedia Australia
  • Ryan Donahue Ryan Donahue
  • Sue Gardner Sue Gardner
  • Ruth Kneale Ruth Kneale Ruth Kneale sponsored by the State Library of Queensland
  • Stuart Candy Stuart Candy Keynote Speaker, Dr Stuart Candy - Professional futurist
  • Ingrid Parent Ingrid Parent Ingrid Parent
  • Jenica Rogers Jenica Rogers Jenica Rogers sponsored by the State Library of Queensland
  • Marcus Foth Marcus Foth
  • NLS6 NLS6
Feb 102013
 

Too much to see in one day? Tried desperately to keep up with yours and the workshop next door? Following from afar?

We’ve captured the narrative – tweets and pics – from yesterday’s workshop day so you can catch up on all the action.

 February 10, 2013  Posted by at 12:12 pm your nls6 Tagged with: , , , , , , ,  No Responses »
Jan 302013
 

This week’s topic up for discussion is practitioner research. Do practitioners have a role in contributing to research? How do practitioners do research? Katherine Howard gives a little introduction to the topic and the workshop – ‘Research for practitioners: getting started and getting supported’. In this workshop, experienced researchers will answer your questions and help turn your ideas into plans. Katherine answers the question that simmers at the back of the minds of practitioners in this profession – I’m a librarian/ archivist/ other information professional. Why should I do research?

Ever heard people say things along the lines of “I wish I’d learnt THAT in Library School” or “Those lecturer-type people don’t have a clue what it’s like to be a librarian/archivist/other information professional today.” Yes?  Well, that’s where you come in!!

Practitioner research is vital for a healthy, growing profession.  Can you imagine if the medical profession never wrote up clinical studies about their patients? Or if engineers didn’t advise their peers about how materials react differently in practical applications? It’s the same for the information professional.  The information sector has seen and continues to see a massive amount of change, and it is those at the ‘coal-face’ who see and experience it first-hand. Decision makers in the workplace need to base their future strategies and actions on evidence and  ‘lecturer-types’ need analytical results to better prepare each new cohort of graduates for the ever-changing information sector. The research that practitioners do (and publish!) plays a big role.  Oh, and a publication or two looks great on the CV, and can set you apart from other applicants as you develop your career.  It shows that you are invested in your profession.

Ok, but how do I actually DO research in my workplace?

I’m glad you asked!

Members of the ALIA Research Committee are conducting a workshop at NLS6 that will present the key elements of a research project. They will also cover the importance of a research proposal, and what you need to include to make yours shine.

If you have ideas about the workshop, feel free to leave a comment about what you would like to know more about, and we’ll try to incorporate it.

Grab your spot in this workshop now. Don’t miss out!

 January 30, 2013  Posted by at 10:30 am program, your nls6 Tagged with: , , , ,  No Responses »
Jan 282013
 

So you’ve just qualified as a library technician – what now? Do you want to learn about career options? Take on some professional development? Network with others in the same situation as yourself?

The 6th New Librarians Symposium (NLS6) can help you do all of this, and the great thing is, the conference is not just for librarians (despite the misleading conference title). Library technicians are more than welcome to attend and I believe they should. Why? Library technicians often have a unique perspective on the industry, and it would be great to see their fresh ideas and energy at the symposium.

Being a new graduate can be tough no matter which course you have graduated from, and events like the NLS6 can help technicians in so many ways. You can find out about the issues that are confronting the libraries at large, get unique perspectives from industry leaders and attend workshops that give you important workplace skills. Who knows it might even give you an edge answering a question in an interview or taking on a new project at work.

I’d love to see lots of new graduates at the conference, whatever course you have graduated from, and it’s not too late to register (ends 8th February)! Look forward to seeing you all there!

 

Claire has always been passionate about libraries and library work. She qualified as a library technician after leaving high school in 1997. Claire has held library assistant and library technician positions in academic, public, special and school libraries.

In 2011 she was the Social and Tours co-ordinator for the Back to Basics National Library and Information Technicians conference held in September. After graduating at the end of 2011 with a Graduate Diploma of Science (Information Services), Claire is currently working as Assistant Branch Librarian at Osborne Park Public Library. Interests outside work include sailing, scrapbooking and barracking for the Dockers :). She is also delivering a presentation  titled: ‘Know thy technician: examining working relationships between librarians and library technicians’ on the NLS6 showcase session.

Jan 132013
 

Can’t make it to NLS6? You can still come to a workshop and the Symposium barbecue!

Workshops

We have opened up registrations for half and full day workshops for people who are not attending NLS6. These workshops will take place on Saturday 9 February (the day before the Symposium starts). While our workshops are geared towards new graduates, the topics are of broader appeal. Our facilitators are experts in their fields, both in Australia and abroad, and the workshops focus on some of the key issues for the information professions right now. Whether you’re a new grad who can’t make it to the whole Symposium or a more experienced information professional looking to kick start your professional development for 2013, we have something to offer you!

Our workshops will cover topics such as leadership, resilience, copyright, research in practice, and professional identity. Check out the full program to see what’s on offer.

Tickets to NLS6 workshops are a steal! We have priced these workshops to sell out and you simply won’t get access to this calibre of speakers anywhere else at these prices.

Half day workshop:

  • Student: $35
  • Standard: $45

Full day workshop:

  • Student: $65
  • Standard: $95

If you are finding it hard to choose a topic, we have a few tips to help you make that right decision.

Made your decision? Then register now! The number of workshop places available to people not attending the full Symposium are extremely limited, so get in quick!

Barbecue

Are you coming to Brisbane for Information Online? Are you a local who would like to take advantage of a great networking opportunity? You can buy a ticket to the NLS6 barbecue (our version of the traditional conference dinner) for just $18. This is a fantastic opportunity to network with new graduates, seasoned professionals, and our awesome speakers. The BBQ will be held from 5.30pm on Monday 11 February at QUT Gardens Point campus. Register now!

 January 13, 2013  Posted by at 11:00 am program, your nls6 Tagged with: , , , ,  No Responses »
Dec 242012
 

Sometimes there are opportunities for you to ‘give back’ to your profession.  It might be volunteering your time and expertise on a committee or a board, it might be mentoring a colleague, it might mean attending an event or just sharing the experience.

In late November, fellow senior professionals from the Brisbane region along with accompanying new professionals shared in a special anniversary, celebrating with a small gathering on the occasion of the 10th Anniversary of the ALIA New Librarian’s Symposium (the first was held 6-7 December 2002).

The generous donations from that evening has meant that we have been able to fund three registration scholarships for NLS6 in February 2013 for self-funding delegates (through the ALIA Queensland Group).

I encourage you all to be generous to the profession whenever you can.  I am very much looking forward to meeting NLS6 delegates in beautiful Brisbane very soon.

Sue Hutley  @suehutley
1st NLS Convenor

….and so after much deliberation, the panel couldn’t decide on just three so we managed to squeeze in four deserving recipients of these registration scholarships. The winners are:

  • Lyndelle Gunton
  • Julie Rankin
  • Tegan Darnell
  • Ashleigh McKergow

Winners will be contacted by the committee chairs in the next few days to make arrangements.

Congratulations to these lucky ducks! And many thanks to all those who applied. We know it’s sometimes tough to self-fund to conferences and the like, however you only need to see the program and workshops on offer to know that this New Librarians’ Symposium is insanely value for money. How often do you get this good of a deal? Think of this as an investment, make the most of the experience and continue building yourself as an information professional.

Save yourself some $$, buy yourself that well-deserved end of year pressie and invest in your future before early bird registrations close at the end of December!

Dec 032012
 

Are you a student who wants to go to NLS6? Will a bursary for registration costs make a real difference for you?

We’ve got great news! An anonymous donor has generously offered three $200AUD bursaries to make NLS6 accessible for students who might not otherwise be able to make it to Brisbane in 2013.

Entry is simple.

You must finish the statement – “I need to attend NLS6 because …”

Send your answers to helpanlsstudent@gmail.com

Answers must be submitted by midday (AEST – Brisbane) Friday 14 December 2012. Winners announced Tuesday 18 December 2012.

Conditions are simple.

You must be studying towards a LIS qualification – either part-time or full-time.
You must tell us where you are studying.
You agree that your statement can be published (anonymously) on our website.

Winning is simple.

A panel will decide on the three statements to win.
Each winner will receive $200AUD towards their registration costs.
If you have already registered for NLS6, we’ll reimburse you $200AUD if you win.

Want to help others to get to NLS6?

These bursaries have been made possible through the generosity of one anonymous donor. If you want to follow their lead, contact the NLS6 Marketing Team to discuss ways you can contribute towards getting your colleagues and students to NLS6. Email us on nls6@newlibrarianssymposium.com

Oct 312012
 

As a student or new graduate, there are some obvious personal benefits to attending NLS6 :

  • contribute to your own professional development
  • build your professional networks with other students, new graduates and potential managers (both Australians and Kiwis)
  • get enthused about your profession and have an amazing few days with the future faces of our industry

But how do you convince your boss? We have put together some resources to help you convince your employer that it is a worthwhile investment to support you to attend NLS6.

To secure funding from your employer you need first to do some research and put forward a watertight case that will prove it is in the interests of your organisation that you attend NLS6.

Mylee Joseph has some fantastic tips and leading questions to get you started Making a Case for Attending a Conference.

1. Research your organisation’s policies/procedures
What do you need to do to apply? Even if there isn’t a formal application process, you are more likely to succeed if you put in a formal application.

2. Research NLS
Look through the program and look for papers that are relevant to your role and/or your library.  Think about it from your managers perspective. Can you relate anything back to your own role/library.

3. What can you give back?
Few people are given Professional development funding without promising something in return. Don’t assume you can’t offer anything because you are in an entry level role – a fresh perspective can be invaluable.
Presentations to staff and reports on what you have learnt are often suggested or required, but think about what small project you could carry out that would have practical results:
– Build a wordpress site for your library after going to Kathryn Greenhill’s workshop
– Check your library’s copyright compliance after attending Ellen Broad’s workshop
– Investigate how your library could implement a virtual storytime with Michelle Collins and Regine Karantzas

4. Plan and budget
Draw up an approximate budget of what it will cost to attend NLS6: registration, accommodation, travel, food, taxis to/from airport. Check out the deals we have arranged and see if there are any sales online for nearby accommodation or travel.

ALA have provided a useful sample memo for attending conferences.  You can use this as inspiration or a base and amend this as needed to make your case to attend NLS6 (make sure you adjust it to NLS6 and to your own application). Access in Google Docs here.

Compromise
See your application as a negotiation process. If your manager can’t justify funding your entire NLS6 application, see if they can pay a section or even just give you conference leave (instead of annual leave) while you fund yourself. Recognise that you may have to put in some extra work outside of work hours to get your application ready and on your return fulfilling all those promises you made to get funding/leave.

Give it a go!
Many libraries will have a budget for staff professional development and it is always worth trying, there might be a bit left over that needs to be spent before the end of 2012!

Don’t lose hope. Putting in an application to attend NLS6 shows your managers that you are eager to develop your career and attend events and the next time you apply for something you might be successful.

Check out our other posts on tips for self funding and other funding possibilities.

 October 31, 2012  Posted by at 11:00 am planning, your nls6 Tagged with: , , , , ,  No Responses »
Oct 022012
 

A couple of weeks ago I spent an enjoyable afternoon working with a group of librarians and library students who were considering submitting a proposal for NLS6. During the afternoon, we explored and developed ideas and I was really inspired by the interesting and very different ideas for topics that came from the various experiences. I hope to see some of those ideas come to life at NLS6.

A couple of days ago there was a lively but brief exhange on twitter, around the ‘L’ word, the perception that some employers are turned off by new grads who present themselves as librarians, and the value of skills to employers. I made the case that when recruiting, I am much more interested in the applicants’ attitude than their skills, as  anyone working in libraries (and probably most other workplaces) will need to be re-skilling and up-skilling regularly. Therefore I want to know that the applicant is someone who will readily pick up new skills and is a self-motivated learner rather than which skills they already possess. Of course that comes with some caveats – there is an expectation of a level of knowledge and understanding of the profession that comes with a professional qualification that is a basic requirement.

Both these events are part of the reasons why I will be attending NLS6 – I want to see and experience the great ideas that our new graduates bring to the table. I am convinced that new ideas and the contact with new grads helps to refresh and challenge us all, and I always learn something. I also believe that there are elements that are, for very valid reasons, underselling the value of our profession, and I would like to contribute to that debate so our new grads get another perspective on a profession that has been in existence and valued for hundreds of years.

There is another reason.

When we have positions to fill which are suitable for a new grad, as a senior manager I want to make sure that we attract the very best of the field. To do that I need to know what will make our roles attractive to the best – and spending more time listening to new grads talk about their ideas, experiences and career ambitions will help me understand how to attract the sort of employee we need to take us into the future.

 

Carolyn McDonald is currently associate director, academic services in information services at Griffith University. Prior to joining Griffith, Carolyn was manager, technology innovation at Bond University, and has over 18 years of experience in (mostly academic) libraries in Western Australia. She also worked at the State Library of WA as manager, digital services prior to coming to Queensland, and as technology librarian at Gold Coast City Council. During her career Carolyn has mostly worked with library systems, but has also worked in other librarian roles including information literacy, lending, reference, document delivery and external student support. You can find Carolyn on twitter at @camcd.

 October 2, 2012  Posted by at 1:00 pm get involved Tagged with: , , ,  No Responses »
Aug 052012
 

There is only 1 week left to submit your proposal for NLS6! Submissions close on the 12th of August.

Do you have something to say to our new and emerging info professionals? Can you inspire, delight and challenge them about our industry? Then what are you waiting for?!

Need convincing? Why not read some past presenters’ reflections and check out their speaker experiences and what they got out of it:

For more details go to our call for proposals page or if you have any further questions email: proposals@newlibrarianssymposium.com.

 

 

 

 August 5, 2012  Posted by at 10:23 am get involved, news, proposals Tagged with: , , ,  No Responses »