• Wikimedia Australia Wikimedia Australia
  • Ryan Donahue Ryan Donahue
  • Sue Gardner Sue Gardner
  • Ruth Kneale Ruth Kneale Ruth Kneale sponsored by the State Library of Queensland
  • Stuart Candy Stuart Candy Keynote Speaker, Dr Stuart Candy - Professional futurist
  • Ingrid Parent Ingrid Parent Ingrid Parent
  • Jenica Rogers Jenica Rogers Jenica Rogers sponsored by the State Library of Queensland
  • Marcus Foth Marcus Foth
  • NLS6 NLS6
Dec 212012
 

There’s only 10 days to go until NLS6 Early Bird Registration closes on Monday 31 December 2012.

With only 10 days left until Early Bird Registration, and only a few days left until Christmas day, you’ll need to make sure that you don’t forget to register for NLS6 amidst all the busy-ness over the coming days.

Join us in Brisbane, Queensland for NLS6 in February 2013.

This ALIA New Graduates event, with discount prices for students and ALIA members, only takes place every two years.

This is a fantastic opportunity to meet other students, network with new graduates, collaborate with your peers, and connect with emerging leaders in the LIS profession.

  • Saturday 9th February is filled with an exciting array of workshops.
  • Sunday 10th and Monday 11th February are packed with inspiring keynote speakers and presenters.
  • Tuesday 12th February is your chance to explore the ALIA Info Online Trade Exhibition.

Click here to get your NLS6 registration underway.

NLS6 Early Bird Registrations close on 31 December 2012. Don’t miss out!

 December 21, 2012  Posted by at 9:00 am news, registration Tagged with: , ,  No Responses »
Dec 202012
 
Enter the New Librarians' Symposium Competition

Enter the New Librarians’ Symposium Competition

Enter without knocking / New Librarian / Symposium / Competition.

Did you know you could win up to $1000 for your NLS6 travel and accommodation? The New Librarians Symposium (NLS6) is generously offering these bursaries, and the competition is being run by New Generation Advisory Committee (NGAC).

How do I enter? All you need to do is express how the bursary could help you to “be different” (just like the conference theme!). Plus, if you look at the word “different” over and over again you’ll get to experience jamais vu, a phenomenon where a repeated word will begin to look alien – different different different different different different different different– and then you get to rediscover it all over again!

Terms and conditions

You can enter if you’re an ALIA personal member who has graduated from an ALIA recognised course in the past 5 years, or if you’re currently studying an ALIA recognised course. This bursary is for people who wouldn’t otherwise receive funding from their organisation to attend the conference. If you have assisted in the organisation of the conference unfortunately you’re ineligible to enter.

Some inspiration for your entry

NLS caters to attendees across the information professions – so you could make a graph of different information roles (and show where you fit into this, in a different way of course), or create a tag cloud with different role types or skills.

Of course you can explore the theme of “being different” in any way that suits you. As the format is open there are so many options – you could film your very own interpretive dance, make music by clapping books together, tweet, create a photo essay, draw something on a window with spray-on snow, pop bubble wrap to the sound of a library anthem, use your book cart to create a giant Art Attack style work by rolling the wheels in maple syrup or mow the NLS6 logo into your library’s lawn (maybe check with your boss about that one!), create a search string about difference and the conference… etcetera! Remember that you get to include a rationale for your entry in the application form, so if you create an esoteric, artistic or short tweet work, that you’ll be able to explain it. You don’t need a hashtag for tweeted entries so you have even more characters available!

Remember to confirm your entry by filling in the form! (apologies for the incorrect date on the form – you really do have till 15 January 2013 to enter).

Sample entry

Here’s a sample entry, a book spine poem on the theme of the benefit of difference. I’m not eligible to enter, but in a different universe, my entry would explain that I focused on searchlight intelligence (linking different concepts) and how to engage new audiences with library resources. Of course I would learn more about this at NLS6!

Be someone different …be yourself / be different… /

…how to think differently / unique value / be yourself little penguin / unique soul.

Book spine poem on the theme of “difference” as a sample entry

Book spine poem on the theme of “difference” as a sample entry

We’ve extended the deadline, so you now have till 15 January 2013 to enter. If you have any questions feel free to contact the New Generation Advisory Committee via @aliangac or aliangac [AT] gmail.com

Happy creating!

Sonja Barfoed, @SonjaBarfoed Committee member of ALIA NGAC @aliangac

 December 20, 2012  Posted by at 10:43 am planning, your nls6 Tagged with: , , , ,  No Responses »
Dec 172012
 

In addition to Jenica Rogers, Ruth Kneale, Ingrid Parent, and Marcus Foth, we’re pleased to be introducing our fifth keynote for NLS6 – Stuart Candy.

Dr Stuart Candy is a professional futurist with a design twist. He helps people engage more creatively and systematically with the worlds they could find themselves in, and generate ways to shape them. He currently works as regional Foresight and Innovation Leader for the global design and engineering firm Arup.

Stuart holds a Ph.D. in political science for pioneering work on ‘experiential futures’, designed immersions as a catalyst for more effective strategic conversation. His writing on this and other topics can be found at The Sceptical Futuryst.

When we asked Stuart, what does it mean to you to ‘be different’, this was his response :

It has been said that all we know about the future is that it will be different. A futurist’s practice of stretching into that difference means having the courage to transition from the known, the comfortable and the familiar into something else – and helping others find a way to do likewise.

Read up on Stuart’s blog, follow him on Twitter (you’ll find him online @futuryst), and start planning all the questions you want to ask him.

Stuart, we’re really looking forward to seeing you at NLS6 in Brisbane in February 2013.

 December 17, 2012  Posted by at 11:00 am program Tagged with: , , , ,  No Responses »
Dec 032012
 

Are you a student who wants to go to NLS6? Will a bursary for registration costs make a real difference for you?

We’ve got great news! An anonymous donor has generously offered three $200AUD bursaries to make NLS6 accessible for students who might not otherwise be able to make it to Brisbane in 2013.

Entry is simple.

You must finish the statement – “I need to attend NLS6 because …”

Send your answers to helpanlsstudent@gmail.com

Answers must be submitted by midday (AEST – Brisbane) Friday 14 December 2012. Winners announced Tuesday 18 December 2012.

Conditions are simple.

You must be studying towards a LIS qualification – either part-time or full-time.
You must tell us where you are studying.
You agree that your statement can be published (anonymously) on our website.

Winning is simple.

A panel will decide on the three statements to win.
Each winner will receive $200AUD towards their registration costs.
If you have already registered for NLS6, we’ll reimburse you $200AUD if you win.

Want to help others to get to NLS6?

These bursaries have been made possible through the generosity of one anonymous donor. If you want to follow their lead, contact the NLS6 Marketing Team to discuss ways you can contribute towards getting your colleagues and students to NLS6. Email us on nls6@newlibrarianssymposium.com

Nov 222012
 

The NLS6 Committee has been hard at work inviting inspirational speakers to Brisbane, and we’re very pleased to share another keynote with you.

Ingrid Parent is the current president of International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA), beginning her term in August 2011.

Ms Parent is recognized nationally & internationally for her outstanding contributions to libraries and to the library profession. She has been involved with several international information associations including UNESCO, the International Publishers Association, the ISSN International Network, the World Intellectual Property Organization, and the Association of Research Libraries. She has played an active role in developing policies & best practices for libraries, particularly in the areas of resource access and digital activities. In 2009, she received the Canadian Association of Research Libraries (CARL) award for Distinguished Service to Research Librarianship.

Once again NLS6 attendees, you’re invited to follow @ingrid_parent on Twitter, along with our other keynotes.

Ingrid, we’re excited that you’ll be joining Jenica Rogers, Ruth Kneale and Marcus Foth as a keynote speaker at NLS6, and we’re really looking forward to meeting you in Brisbane in February 2013.

 November 22, 2012  Posted by at 11:00 am program Tagged with: , , , ,  No Responses »
Nov 142012
 

So, you want to go to NLS6 but your organisation can’t fund you and those new shoes were just too tempting. Don’t despair…

The New Generation Advisory Committee (NGAC) is running a competition to win a bursary towards part of your travel and/or accommodation costs to attend the ALIA 6th New Librarians Symposium (NLS6), held in Brisbane from 9-12 February 2013.

The competition is open to presenters and non-presenters just wanting to go to for the experience. There are only two requirements – you must be a personal member of ALIA and must not have been involved in organising the symposium.

Entering is simple. Fill in the application form, write a short statement and then get creative! Use a digital format and tell us how the symposium themes or sub-themes will help you ‘be different’.

NLS6 is an exciting opportunity to learn more about the library profession, meet other new professionals and be inspired as you set out in your career.

We want lots of entries, so get thinking!

Check out the entry form for competition details.

Any questions contact Danielle or Kate at aliangac@gmail.com

 November 14, 2012  Posted by at 1:00 pm planning, your nls6 Tagged with: , , ,  No Responses »
Oct 312012
 

As a student or new graduate, there are some obvious personal benefits to attending NLS6 :

  • contribute to your own professional development
  • build your professional networks with other students, new graduates and potential managers (both Australians and Kiwis)
  • get enthused about your profession and have an amazing few days with the future faces of our industry

But how do you convince your boss? We have put together some resources to help you convince your employer that it is a worthwhile investment to support you to attend NLS6.

To secure funding from your employer you need first to do some research and put forward a watertight case that will prove it is in the interests of your organisation that you attend NLS6.

Mylee Joseph has some fantastic tips and leading questions to get you started Making a Case for Attending a Conference.

1. Research your organisation’s policies/procedures
What do you need to do to apply? Even if there isn’t a formal application process, you are more likely to succeed if you put in a formal application.

2. Research NLS
Look through the program and look for papers that are relevant to your role and/or your library.  Think about it from your managers perspective. Can you relate anything back to your own role/library.

3. What can you give back?
Few people are given Professional development funding without promising something in return. Don’t assume you can’t offer anything because you are in an entry level role – a fresh perspective can be invaluable.
Presentations to staff and reports on what you have learnt are often suggested or required, but think about what small project you could carry out that would have practical results:
– Build a wordpress site for your library after going to Kathryn Greenhill’s workshop
– Check your library’s copyright compliance after attending Ellen Broad’s workshop
– Investigate how your library could implement a virtual storytime with Michelle Collins and Regine Karantzas

4. Plan and budget
Draw up an approximate budget of what it will cost to attend NLS6: registration, accommodation, travel, food, taxis to/from airport. Check out the deals we have arranged and see if there are any sales online for nearby accommodation or travel.

ALA have provided a useful sample memo for attending conferences.  You can use this as inspiration or a base and amend this as needed to make your case to attend NLS6 (make sure you adjust it to NLS6 and to your own application). Access in Google Docs here.

Compromise
See your application as a negotiation process. If your manager can’t justify funding your entire NLS6 application, see if they can pay a section or even just give you conference leave (instead of annual leave) while you fund yourself. Recognise that you may have to put in some extra work outside of work hours to get your application ready and on your return fulfilling all those promises you made to get funding/leave.

Give it a go!
Many libraries will have a budget for staff professional development and it is always worth trying, there might be a bit left over that needs to be spent before the end of 2012!

Don’t lose hope. Putting in an application to attend NLS6 shows your managers that you are eager to develop your career and attend events and the next time you apply for something you might be successful.

Check out our other posts on tips for self funding and other funding possibilities.

 October 31, 2012  Posted by at 11:00 am planning, your nls6 Tagged with: , , , , ,  No Responses »
Oct 302012
 

So you’ve made the call to attend NLS6, and now you’re looking for creative ways to find funding to help out with costs. To help you on your way, I’ve asked previous NLS attendees for their ideas about how to make your NLS6 happen if funds are the only things standing in your way. Hana W is based in Wellington (New Zealand). Kim T is based in Melbourne (Australia). Both attended NLS5 in Perth (2011).

Hana : I attended one day of NLS5 after I attended & presented at ALIA Libtec in 2011. I used funding awarded from my regional LIANZA committee, Te Upoko o te Ika a Maui, and to get to Perth I received funding from my employer.

Kim : I was already attending ALIA National Library & Information Technicians Conference and was fortunate that my workplace allowed me to stay for both. It is worth considering sharing accommodation with someone you know who is attending if possible.

Hana : If you are funding yourself, I’d suggest staying at a backpackers close to the conference venue (I stayed at a local backpackers down the road from NLS5 venue).

For the Australian-based folks, here’s some ideas for keeping your costs low :

  • Keep in touch with other new grads in the ALIA New Graduates Group, to find out who else is going to NLS6 from your region to share travel and/or accommodation with.
  • Find out if you are eligible for one of the ALIA Awards.
  • If you are currently working, then approach your employer about partially paying for some of your costs. Be creative with your pitch, and maybe they could cover your accommodation, or your flights, or your registration costs.

For the New Zealand-based folks, here’s some suggestions about sourcing funding from Hana :

  • Apply to your employer. Yes, it means crafting a well written and convincing application, but it is worth it.
  • Apply to your local LIANZA regional committee for the Hydestor award.
  • Check with your local LIANZA committee if they have any discretionary funding for professional development opportunities.
  • Apply for the Ada Fache fund if applicable.

You might also find that there are funding sources outside of your library sphere. Do you belong to other groups that have funding grants?  Are you a student of an institution that offers travel grants? Does anyone in your family belong to Lions or Rotary groups? Are you an member of another professional body that offers professional development grants? Now is the time to cast your net wide so that you can join us at NLS6.

Image of Hana WHana W is based in Wellington, New Zealand. She is a self confessed library geek, as proven by her blog, Library.Geek. She’s @thewhaanga. She’s the former editor of LIANZA’s Library Life.

 

 

 

Image of Kim TKim T is a crafter, maker and runner based in Melbourne, Australia. She is the Manager, Hawthorn Campus Library at Swinburne University. She’s @haikugirlOz and an Aurora alumni.

 October 30, 2012  Posted by at 11:00 am accommodation, travel, your nls6 Tagged with: , , , , ,  No Responses »
Oct 192012
 

eBooks. It seems everyone has something to say about them. Why do eBooks matter to libraries?  Should librarians in fact be breaking up with eBooks? While talk of eBooks is surely going to be happening over coffees at NLS6, perhaps we will be crying over their terrible treatment of us after sinking a few beers, one thing is certain. No matter what the format, there are books that make us laugh, books that make us cry and books that inspire us to do something. So while there is no doubt talking about eBooks with your peers at NLS could help you understand this complex issue, right now let’s just talk books, in particular books about Brisbane.

When I first moved to Brisbane someone gave me a copy of He Died with a Falafel in His Hand, John Birmingham’s epic house-sharing novel, particularly appropriate as I was living in a grungy group house at the time. This hilarious book and the craziness it details was my first introduction to the wonderful land of Brisbane literature and since then I have become a huge fan of many authors that write about this city. It was Nick Earls stories about living in the inner city in novels like Zigzag Street and Bachelor Kisses that made me explore my neighbourhood, and Rebecca Sparrow’s The Girl Most Likely made a whole new set of Brisbane suburbs seem cool. For a completely different take on Brisbane I stepped back in time with David Malouf’s Johnno which gave me a new insight into Brisbane and its history.

Brisbane, Brisneyland, Brisvegas, however you want to refer to it there is a book out there that will capture your heart and let you unlock a little piece of the city. A book that will make you feel like you are living in the sub-tropical heat with frangipani blooming outside your window as you sip, well, you get the idea.

So before you come to NLS6 and dive into discussions about eBooks, books and every other kind of resource libraries have to offer (including the librarians!) take some time to find a book about Brisbane that inspires you to have a look around another part of the city before or after the symposium. If you need some inspiration take a look at this list of books about Brisbane. And when you get here take some time to do the Albert St Literary walk in the city, this is an easy walk from NLS6 HQ,  it lets you see what other famous authors think about Brisbane, and best of all it’s free!

If you have any recommendations about books that explore Brisbane, please add a comment below and I look forward to speaking with you at NLS6 after you have delved into Brisbane fiction on whichever platform you choose.

Disclaimer: While NLS6 is promising to be a hell of a good time we cannot promise that it will live up to the debauchery portrayed in books such as He Died with a Falafel in His Hand, after all information professionals are a staid and serious lot aren’t we??? 😉

 October 19, 2012  Posted by at 11:00 am out and about, planning Tagged with: , , , ,  No Responses »
Oct 102012
 
Jenica Rogers

With early bird registration now open, we know that you’ll be keen to know more about our NLS6 keynote speakers. In addition to Ruth Kneale and Marcus Foth, please put your hands together (*waves* on Twitter) for… Jenica Rogers, Director of Libraries at the State University of New York at Potsdam, coming from a background in cataloging, collection development, and staff training. Jenica’s already excited to be coming to Australia in 2013, as she enthused on her blog, Attempting Elegance.

We’re thrilled to have Jenica joining us in February 2013, to inspire us and to encourage us to be different. When we asked Jenica what it means to be different, she shared this with us:

I’ve always been fascinated by the firsts of human history and culture, from the mundane to the monumental. I’m just as interested in how we first began cultivating grasses until they became maize as I am in how we put a human into orbit around the Earth as I am in how we figured out that mold could cure disease.

And since I’m so intrigued by those firsts, those changes, those next and new steps, I can’t help but see that those firsts came about because someone decided to try something new. To move against the steady stream of humanity around them. To challenge the status quo. To improve on current reality. To be different.

It’s not easy making those changes and being different; you hold yourself up to your peers, your community, your culture as an object of attention when you flout convention, and that scrutiny isn’t always comfortable. But I think a willingness to be different and to challenge our base assumptions is what allows us to innovate.

I think it’s the root of most of the remarkable things we’ve accomplished.

I think it’s worth the risk.

Jenica, we’re excited that you’ll be joining Ruth Kneale and Marcus Foth as a keynote speaker at NLS6, and we’re looking forward to seeing you in Brisbane in February 2013.

Again, your challenge now folks is to follow all of our keynotes on Twitter (@sunday9pm, @jenica26, @desertlibrarian), read their blogs and think about how you want to share your ‘be different’ enthusiasm.

Jenica Rogers

 October 10, 2012  Posted by at 11:00 am news, program Tagged with: , , , ,  No Responses »