• Wikimedia Australia Wikimedia Australia
  • Ryan Donahue Ryan Donahue
  • Sue Gardner Sue Gardner
  • Ruth Kneale Ruth Kneale Ruth Kneale sponsored by the State Library of Queensland
  • Stuart Candy Stuart Candy Keynote Speaker, Dr Stuart Candy - Professional futurist
  • Ingrid Parent Ingrid Parent Ingrid Parent
  • Jenica Rogers Jenica Rogers Jenica Rogers sponsored by the State Library of Queensland
  • Marcus Foth Marcus Foth
  • NLS6 NLS6
Oct 302012
 

So you’ve made the call to attend NLS6, and now you’re looking for creative ways to find funding to help out with costs. To help you on your way, I’ve asked previous NLS attendees for their ideas about how to make your NLS6 happen if funds are the only things standing in your way. Hana W is based in Wellington (New Zealand). Kim T is based in Melbourne (Australia). Both attended NLS5 in Perth (2011).

Hana : I attended one day of NLS5 after I attended & presented at ALIA Libtec in 2011. I used funding awarded from my regional LIANZA committee, Te Upoko o te Ika a Maui, and to get to Perth I received funding from my employer.

Kim : I was already attending ALIA National Library & Information Technicians Conference and was fortunate that my workplace allowed me to stay for both. It is worth considering sharing accommodation with someone you know who is attending if possible.

Hana : If you are funding yourself, I’d suggest staying at a backpackers close to the conference venue (I stayed at a local backpackers down the road from NLS5 venue).

For the Australian-based folks, here’s some ideas for keeping your costs low :

  • Keep in touch with other new grads in the ALIA New Graduates Group, to find out who else is going to NLS6 from your region to share travel and/or accommodation with.
  • Find out if you are eligible for one of the ALIA Awards.
  • If you are currently working, then approach your employer about partially paying for some of your costs. Be creative with your pitch, and maybe they could cover your accommodation, or your flights, or your registration costs.

For the New Zealand-based folks, here’s some suggestions about sourcing funding from Hana :

  • Apply to your employer. Yes, it means crafting a well written and convincing application, but it is worth it.
  • Apply to your local LIANZA regional committee for the Hydestor award.
  • Check with your local LIANZA committee if they have any discretionary funding for professional development opportunities.
  • Apply for the Ada Fache fund if applicable.

You might also find that there are funding sources outside of your library sphere. Do you belong to other groups that have funding grants?  Are you a student of an institution that offers travel grants? Does anyone in your family belong to Lions or Rotary groups? Are you an member of another professional body that offers professional development grants? Now is the time to cast your net wide so that you can join us at NLS6.

Image of Hana WHana W is based in Wellington, New Zealand. She is a self confessed library geek, as proven by her blog, Library.Geek. She’s @thewhaanga. She’s the former editor of LIANZA’s Library Life.

 

 

 

Image of Kim TKim T is a crafter, maker and runner based in Melbourne, Australia. She is the Manager, Hawthorn Campus Library at Swinburne University. She’s @haikugirlOz and an Aurora alumni.

 October 30, 2012  Posted by at 11:00 am accommodation, travel, your nls6 Tagged with: , , , , ,  No Responses »
Sep 282012
 

As a student, I struggle with spending time on things I want to do for fun, and things I should do for professional development. Fortunately, some things fit both categories! The New Librarians Symposium is full of fresh ideas, memorable presentations, and people who are doing amazing things in the industry. NLS5 was the first professional library event I attended, so perhaps I’m biased, but it will be difficult for other conferences to live up to my memory of it. I was excited, overwhelmed, and more than a little awed by the sheer number of awesome people in one place.

The banner that greeted me at NLS5A year on, I can barely recall the venue or the food; that’s okay, because that’s not what NLS is about. I made new friends, learned new things, networked, and contributed to the Twitter back channel. The lectures I’d attended at QUT had given me some idea of the breadth of roles available in libraries, but NLS5 made it clear just how limitless my options would be. I was surrounded by real librarians, and their jobs sounded interesting, challenging, and meaningful.

The  2011 keynote speaker lineup was a who’s who in libraryland: Mal Booth, Kate Davis, Kathryn Greenhill, and – all the way from the US – David Lee King. The plenary addresses were given by Sam Hughes, the children’s librarian at WA State Library, and Garry Conroy-Cooper, a man everybody wants to work for. I have come to know and respect these people, and their work, in the past year. What’s so amazing (aside from Sam’s ability to lead a ballroom of adults in a rendition of Twinkle Twinkle) was the immediacy of what the speakers had to say.

Because NLS is a symposium, not a conference, there’s less lead time in submitting and selecting presentations. This means that topics are fresh. Instead of hearing about tired concepts and technology, you can learn what’s hot, right now. And NLS is not strictly for managers, or experienced librarians — it’s for you! You can go home, brimming with enthusiasm, and put those ideas to work.

I attended a workshop prior to the symposium, How to get THE job, and got some great tips. By the close of NLS5, I was feeling so confident and enthusiastic, I asked Steve McQuade if I could come to the State Library of WA and do my practicum. He said yes! Those two weeks were among the best in my two-year journey to becoming a qualified librarian. You never know where the connections you’ll make at NLS will lead.

If the calibre of the speakers at NLS5 is anything to go by, you’ll be blown away at next year’s symposium. Trust me, you don’t want to miss out on all the fun. Go on, be different – at NLS6!

 

Julia Garnett is the 2011 winner of ALIA’s New Generation Advisory Committee (NGAC) competition for free registration to NLS5. She is in her final semester of the LIS program at QUT, and can’t wait to blend her love of technology, books, research, and the community in her first role as a librarian. When she’s not reading on her Kindle, you can catch her singing, blogging, or learning hip hop.

Julia, @jzgarnett

 

 

 September 28, 2012  Posted by at 11:00 am get involved Tagged with: , , ,  No Responses »
Jul 082012
 

For me, NLS is an important date on the ALIA calendar as it provides an opportunity for new librarians to have their first formal conference experience…either as an attendee, presenter or even as part of the organising committee. I presented my first (and to date, only) conference paper at NLS in 2008. While I was probably on the outer limit of being considered a new graduate, convening the 2011 symposium back to back with the ALIA National Library & Information Technicians Conference and to develop a conference that represented my vision for NLS was too good an opportunity to pass up.

My observation of previous symposia, and conferences in general, is that they are far too passive and as such we tried to develop a program that balanced presentations with practical workshops to ensure delegates returned to their libraries with a wider range of skills than they came with. To me a new librarian is someone who has had 3-5 years of professional experience at most, as opposed to the definition at the time which was up to 10 years! Another intention of incorporating workshops therefore was to encourage and challenge new librarians to gain new skills that might help them to move towards taking the next steps in their careers, become our new generation of leaders and managers and making their next conference one of the mainstream ALIA conferences.

I believe that the alignment of NLS6 with Information Online will continue to encourage new librarians to develop in their careers. Online has traditionally been well attended by new librarians and the focus on innovative technologies is in line with how libraries are and should be developing. Online also provides the opportunity for new librarians to develop connections with existing leaders and managers in the profession, a definite advantage of this model over the traditional symposium.

I look forward to seeing NLS6 take shape and providing the opportunity for new librarians to experience two of the most innovative events that ALIA presents.

 

Steve is currently the Manager, Library Services at Edith Cowan University in Western Australia and was the convenor for NLS5.  He has previously worked in public libraries and the State Library of WA where among other things he was heavily involved in their Graduate Program.  Steve has also been a member of the ALIA NGAC. Steve’s passions in libraries are people and new technologies and is all about encouraging and mentoring people to take their next steps in their career and to be receptive to change.

 

 July 8, 2012  Posted by at 11:01 am bits and pieces Tagged with: , ,  No Responses »