• Wikimedia Australia Wikimedia Australia
  • Ryan Donahue Ryan Donahue
  • Sue Gardner Sue Gardner
  • Ruth Kneale Ruth Kneale Ruth Kneale sponsored by the State Library of Queensland
  • Stuart Candy Stuart Candy Keynote Speaker, Dr Stuart Candy - Professional futurist
  • Ingrid Parent Ingrid Parent Ingrid Parent
  • Jenica Rogers Jenica Rogers Jenica Rogers sponsored by the State Library of Queensland
  • Marcus Foth Marcus Foth
  • NLS6 NLS6
Jan 282013
 

So you’ve just qualified as a library technician – what now? Do you want to learn about career options? Take on some professional development? Network with others in the same situation as yourself?

The 6th New Librarians Symposium (NLS6) can help you do all of this, and the great thing is, the conference is not just for librarians (despite the misleading conference title). Library technicians are more than welcome to attend and I believe they should. Why? Library technicians often have a unique perspective on the industry, and it would be great to see their fresh ideas and energy at the symposium.

Being a new graduate can be tough no matter which course you have graduated from, and events like the NLS6 can help technicians in so many ways. You can find out about the issues that are confronting the libraries at large, get unique perspectives from industry leaders and attend workshops that give you important workplace skills. Who knows it might even give you an edge answering a question in an interview or taking on a new project at work.

I’d love to see lots of new graduates at the conference, whatever course you have graduated from, and it’s not too late to register (ends 8th February)! Look forward to seeing you all there!

 

Claire has always been passionate about libraries and library work. She qualified as a library technician after leaving high school in 1997. Claire has held library assistant and library technician positions in academic, public, special and school libraries.

In 2011 she was the Social and Tours co-ordinator for the Back to Basics National Library and Information Technicians conference held in September. After graduating at the end of 2011 with a Graduate Diploma of Science (Information Services), Claire is currently working as Assistant Branch Librarian at Osborne Park Public Library. Interests outside work include sailing, scrapbooking and barracking for the Dockers :). She is also delivering a presentation  titled: ‘Know thy technician: examining working relationships between librarians and library technicians’ on the NLS6 showcase session.

Jan 272013
 

I feel like a fraud. I’m presenting at NLS6 and I’m still in the process of studying my Grad Dip in Library and Information Studies. It may be that I’m a very convincing fraud or that the skills I gained from my previous industry had put me in good stead for my new career choice. I like to think it is the latter.

I came from the museum industry and to be honest the leap from museums to libraries wasn’t huge but if you have come from the police like my, “We’re not from around here” co-presenter Raylene Jensen, the leap was far greater. She probably has better conflict management skills than I do.  However, my project management skills have enabled me to step into a temporary role of program development officer for the Gold Coast Library Services. Furthermore, the network of contacts from the arts and cultural industries has meant that I have been able to co-ordinate exhibitions and performance in libraries.

So, if you are coming to NLS as an “outsider” or a new graduate be aware that there is a need for your skills, be they from business, sporting, arts or elsewhere. Raylene and I will be talking about the benefits of coming from other industries and not being afraid to take chances in your new career choice.

 

Sophie Gow has a background in museum curatorship and event organisation, working for not for profit arts organisations and the peak industry body for museums and galleries in Queensland.  After successfully getting a job as a library assistant for Gold Coast Libraries the natural progression was to take over the library service. Sophie is currently embarking on her Grad Dip in Library Studies, which in many ways is not such a leap from museum management.

 

 

 January 27, 2013  Posted by at 10:00 am program, your nls6 Tagged with: , , ,  No Responses »
Dec 032012
 

Are you a student who wants to go to NLS6? Will a bursary for registration costs make a real difference for you?

We’ve got great news! An anonymous donor has generously offered three $200AUD bursaries to make NLS6 accessible for students who might not otherwise be able to make it to Brisbane in 2013.

Entry is simple.

You must finish the statement – “I need to attend NLS6 because …”

Send your answers to helpanlsstudent@gmail.com

Answers must be submitted by midday (AEST – Brisbane) Friday 14 December 2012. Winners announced Tuesday 18 December 2012.

Conditions are simple.

You must be studying towards a LIS qualification – either part-time or full-time.
You must tell us where you are studying.
You agree that your statement can be published (anonymously) on our website.

Winning is simple.

A panel will decide on the three statements to win.
Each winner will receive $200AUD towards their registration costs.
If you have already registered for NLS6, we’ll reimburse you $200AUD if you win.

Want to help others to get to NLS6?

These bursaries have been made possible through the generosity of one anonymous donor. If you want to follow their lead, contact the NLS6 Marketing Team to discuss ways you can contribute towards getting your colleagues and students to NLS6. Email us on nls6@newlibrarianssymposium.com

Oct 312012
 

As a student or new graduate, there are some obvious personal benefits to attending NLS6 :

  • contribute to your own professional development
  • build your professional networks with other students, new graduates and potential managers (both Australians and Kiwis)
  • get enthused about your profession and have an amazing few days with the future faces of our industry

But how do you convince your boss? We have put together some resources to help you convince your employer that it is a worthwhile investment to support you to attend NLS6.

To secure funding from your employer you need first to do some research and put forward a watertight case that will prove it is in the interests of your organisation that you attend NLS6.

Mylee Joseph has some fantastic tips and leading questions to get you started Making a Case for Attending a Conference.

1. Research your organisation’s policies/procedures
What do you need to do to apply? Even if there isn’t a formal application process, you are more likely to succeed if you put in a formal application.

2. Research NLS
Look through the program and look for papers that are relevant to your role and/or your library.  Think about it from your managers perspective. Can you relate anything back to your own role/library.

3. What can you give back?
Few people are given Professional development funding without promising something in return. Don’t assume you can’t offer anything because you are in an entry level role – a fresh perspective can be invaluable.
Presentations to staff and reports on what you have learnt are often suggested or required, but think about what small project you could carry out that would have practical results:
– Build a wordpress site for your library after going to Kathryn Greenhill’s workshop
– Check your library’s copyright compliance after attending Ellen Broad’s workshop
– Investigate how your library could implement a virtual storytime with Michelle Collins and Regine Karantzas

4. Plan and budget
Draw up an approximate budget of what it will cost to attend NLS6: registration, accommodation, travel, food, taxis to/from airport. Check out the deals we have arranged and see if there are any sales online for nearby accommodation or travel.

ALA have provided a useful sample memo for attending conferences.  You can use this as inspiration or a base and amend this as needed to make your case to attend NLS6 (make sure you adjust it to NLS6 and to your own application). Access in Google Docs here.

Compromise
See your application as a negotiation process. If your manager can’t justify funding your entire NLS6 application, see if they can pay a section or even just give you conference leave (instead of annual leave) while you fund yourself. Recognise that you may have to put in some extra work outside of work hours to get your application ready and on your return fulfilling all those promises you made to get funding/leave.

Give it a go!
Many libraries will have a budget for staff professional development and it is always worth trying, there might be a bit left over that needs to be spent before the end of 2012!

Don’t lose hope. Putting in an application to attend NLS6 shows your managers that you are eager to develop your career and attend events and the next time you apply for something you might be successful.

Check out our other posts on tips for self funding and other funding possibilities.

 October 31, 2012  Posted by at 11:00 am planning, your nls6 Tagged with: , , , , ,  No Responses »
Sep 282012
 

As a student, I struggle with spending time on things I want to do for fun, and things I should do for professional development. Fortunately, some things fit both categories! The New Librarians Symposium is full of fresh ideas, memorable presentations, and people who are doing amazing things in the industry. NLS5 was the first professional library event I attended, so perhaps I’m biased, but it will be difficult for other conferences to live up to my memory of it. I was excited, overwhelmed, and more than a little awed by the sheer number of awesome people in one place.

The banner that greeted me at NLS5A year on, I can barely recall the venue or the food; that’s okay, because that’s not what NLS is about. I made new friends, learned new things, networked, and contributed to the Twitter back channel. The lectures I’d attended at QUT had given me some idea of the breadth of roles available in libraries, but NLS5 made it clear just how limitless my options would be. I was surrounded by real librarians, and their jobs sounded interesting, challenging, and meaningful.

The  2011 keynote speaker lineup was a who’s who in libraryland: Mal Booth, Kate Davis, Kathryn Greenhill, and – all the way from the US – David Lee King. The plenary addresses were given by Sam Hughes, the children’s librarian at WA State Library, and Garry Conroy-Cooper, a man everybody wants to work for. I have come to know and respect these people, and their work, in the past year. What’s so amazing (aside from Sam’s ability to lead a ballroom of adults in a rendition of Twinkle Twinkle) was the immediacy of what the speakers had to say.

Because NLS is a symposium, not a conference, there’s less lead time in submitting and selecting presentations. This means that topics are fresh. Instead of hearing about tired concepts and technology, you can learn what’s hot, right now. And NLS is not strictly for managers, or experienced librarians — it’s for you! You can go home, brimming with enthusiasm, and put those ideas to work.

I attended a workshop prior to the symposium, How to get THE job, and got some great tips. By the close of NLS5, I was feeling so confident and enthusiastic, I asked Steve McQuade if I could come to the State Library of WA and do my practicum. He said yes! Those two weeks were among the best in my two-year journey to becoming a qualified librarian. You never know where the connections you’ll make at NLS will lead.

If the calibre of the speakers at NLS5 is anything to go by, you’ll be blown away at next year’s symposium. Trust me, you don’t want to miss out on all the fun. Go on, be different – at NLS6!

 

Julia Garnett is the 2011 winner of ALIA’s New Generation Advisory Committee (NGAC) competition for free registration to NLS5. She is in her final semester of the LIS program at QUT, and can’t wait to blend her love of technology, books, research, and the community in her first role as a librarian. When she’s not reading on her Kindle, you can catch her singing, blogging, or learning hip hop.

Julia, @jzgarnett

 

 

 September 28, 2012  Posted by at 11:00 am get involved Tagged with: , , ,  No Responses »
Jun 082012
 

What is the definition of a ‘new professional’? In terms of a period of time, you’ve probably hear people talk about new professionals as having been in the profession for up to about five years.

But so many variables are involved in how we think about ourselves and our ‘newness’. If you make a big job change after a few years in the profession (like going from public libraries to corporate information management), you might find you still feel like a new professional well beyond that five year mark. If you make a transition to a senior position early in your career, you might feel like the term ‘new professional’ doesn’t apply to you, even if you’re only a few years out from your graduation. In reality, the idea of ‘new’ in the context of your professional status is entirely subjective and unique to you.

That’s why we’ve decided to take a different view of what ‘new’ means for NLS6. We’re working to develop a program that is tailored for all professionals who feel like they fit somewhere in the spectrum of newness… From those who are thinking about embarking on studies in LIS, to those who have been doing information work for years but are only recently qualified as info pros, to those who have been in the profession for more than five years and are thinking about the next phase of their careers.

For the first time, NLS6 will have a stream dedicated to those professionals who still kinda feel new to the profession, but who think they’re almost ready to shed their new grad status. We’ve got some ideas for this stream, but we’d also love to hear from those of you who fall into this category. What do you need to help you set off on your next adventure?

 June 8, 2012  Posted by at 5:57 pm planning, program Tagged with: , , ,  No Responses »