• Wikimedia Australia Wikimedia Australia
  • Ryan Donahue Ryan Donahue
  • Sue Gardner Sue Gardner
  • Ruth Kneale Ruth Kneale Ruth Kneale sponsored by the State Library of Queensland
  • Stuart Candy Stuart Candy Keynote Speaker, Dr Stuart Candy - Professional futurist
  • Ingrid Parent Ingrid Parent Ingrid Parent
  • Jenica Rogers Jenica Rogers Jenica Rogers sponsored by the State Library of Queensland
  • Marcus Foth Marcus Foth
  • NLS6 NLS6
Feb 202013
 

Looking back over my notes from NLS6 I was overwhelmed by the sheer quantity of quality speakers I got to experience within such a short space of time. So many people presented each with so much to offer. As a student relatively new to library studies this experience was both intimidating and inspiring. I learnt so much. However, there were a few things that really stood out.

Mistakes should be turned into learning experiences. To hear this from a number of people who have been in the industry for quite some time was liberating. As a new student who is about to start job hunting within the industry, it’s nice to know that the pressure is off, I don’t have to be perfect and know the best way things should be done immediately, rather I need to strive to do the right thing and be willing to learn from any failures along the way.

Actively seek out opportunities. Opportunities won’t always fall into my lap, sometimes I’ll have to actively look for them in order to grow my skill set and challenge myself. There are so many opportunities out there and the more I become involved in them the more new opportunities will open up to me.

Network like crazy. Networking is important, super important, and as it turns out, it’s also rather fun! Networking isn’t just a way to find new job opportunities, but it opens up the possibility of learning from other peoples’ experiences. By choosing to network I’m opening myself up to a whole wealth of knowledge. People have a lot to offer and I need to seek out what they can teach me. This way, I’ll be a better librarian and a better person from it.

Everyone has their own path to follow.  My own individual journey will be different from everyone else’s. I can learn from them, but I shouldn’t let anyone else’s experiences dictate how my own path pans out. Instead I should relish that I’m different and let my own individual path be a reflection of who I am as a person.

I’m sad NLS6 is over, but I’m so very glad I impulsively chose to go. I learnt so much and met so many wonderful people who encouraged me and inspired me to keep moving forward. This really was the perfect start to the year, it inspired me to go forward into the job hunt and BE BOLD (with bananas)*.

*Note: Be bold with bananas is a reference to one of the conference sessions, for further information I would suggest twitter #beboldwithbananas…you’re welcome.

 

 

 February 20, 2013  Posted by at 11:00 am get involved, your nls6 Tagged with: , , , ,  No Responses »
Jan 312013
 

NLS6 is just around the corner, almost time to dust off the suitcase and get ready to head to sunny Brisvegas. So what do you pack? Or if you’re a Brisbane local who can take advantage of having their home comforts at hand, what should you bring to the conference each day?

Well, the best people to ask are your network, those who have done it before and have got the low down on conference essentials.
I turned to Twitter, crowdsourced for suggestions and here’s what my network told me…

A Twitter account and a business card. Twitter allows you to connect with people and will be a fantastic way to catch up with your new connections when NLS6 is over.

While Twitter is a great tool for making connections, having a business card to hand out is a sure fire way to stick in people’s memories. It doesn’t have to be a business card from an organisation either. A card that you have designed with links to your online resume or blog can get people interested in finding out more about you. And if you haven’t got time to get some business cards made up then bring some coloured paper and some pens and had out your details.

Those post-it notes will also come in handy for you to jot down a note reminding you about the person who gave you their card and what you might like to speak to them about in the future.

Ok, some of professional items ticked off. Now for the practical bit!

My network tells me comfy shoes are a must as well as outfits that are going to take you from the symposium to dinner and drinks afterwards. For a great list of what to pack and check out this list of what to pack for a weekend away. While NLS6 is a professional event and is going to provide you with some amazing professional development opportunities as well as inspiration by the bucketload, it’s also important to remember that it’s Brisbane on the weekend. No-one is going to be expecting you to show up in a business suit, which is why the Elsevier NLS6 BBQ has a beach theme. Seeing as you’ll save room in your suitcase by skipping the suit jackets, you can throw some boardies in.

Just remember it’s Brisbane in summer, so yes it is going to be hot (and humid), but it might also be raining (remember the brolly!) The conference location is air-conditioned, so ensure to pack a few layers you can take on and off easily and won’t take up much room in your bag.

And the last two important things to pack? Water and gadget chargers. Water because it’s Brisbane in summer, it’s hot, yes I am repeating myself I know! And gadget chargers because there is nothing worse than being without power when you really want to call,text, email or tweet someone. If you’ve got room throw in some spare chargers too, and as @katiedatwork said, ‘bring a powerboard and you’ll meet lots of new people!’.

For some more tips on conference survival have a look at advice these librarians offer. Conference veterans know what they are talking about.

Conference Survival Tips – 35 Conferences Later

A Library Conference Survival Guide – 20 Tips

So happy packing and safe travels, but before you rush off to start testing out comfy shoes, if you have any other suggestions on what to pack or how to survive, please feel free to share them in the comments below!

Many thanks to those who contributed their survival and packing suggestions – @acrystelle, @katiedatwork, @madradish, @lyndelleg, @SpiroAgnew2012 and @sutherma.

 January 31, 2013  Posted by at 10:30 am planning, travel, your nls6 Tagged with: , , , , ,  No Responses »
Jan 252013
 

You’ve registered for the symposium and you are excited about it.  Three whole days of learning and discovering the issues that affect information professionals.  But you’re also nervous, because you have never been to a symposium before. What to expect? Who will I meet?

It sounds overwhelming but it is vital to network when attending professional events such as the New Librarians’ Symposium.  It’s a tough time in the job market.  However networking opens the door to jobs and sectors you never knew existed.  You can meet people who can become lifelong friends or even your future employer.  The possibilities are endless, and with social media, it has never been easier to keep in contact with people.

Not convinced? Picture this – being in a room where everyone knows each other except you.  The feeling of being the odd one out does not sit well.  That is how I felt when I attended a professional development session.  Fortunately, I received some wise words from a liaison librarian based in Saskatchewan, Canada who helped me overcome this situation.  She advised me to become more involved in my profession and industry. She told me to NETWORK.

This is what I did:

  • I opened up a Twitter account and started following random people in my industry.
  • I created a Linkedin profile and joined some of the Information and Knowledge Management groups such as CILIP and IFLA.   
  • Created a business card highlighting my qualifications and my skills and handed these out to conference delegates and keynotes. Be confident – know who you are and what you can offer.

You have done all that and are at the symposium and you are surrounded by people you have never met before. Anxiety hits and thoughts such as these may rush through your head:

‘What happens if I don’t know anyone?’

‘Why would anyone want to listen to me?’

‘I’m not important.’

My advice is to take a deep breath, then approach people and introduce yourself.  Sure it will be awkward, but it is better than missing the opportunity.  If in the first few minutes of introducing yourself, the person does not say much, feel free to excuse yourself.  It is not rude to walk away politely if the conversation is forced and the answers you receive are short.

And if you’re stuck, here are some icebreakers to think about:

  • After introductions, ask them (if you are at the symposium) what sessions they will be attending
  • Follow on with the question – what kind of services do your organisation offer?
  • If they are wearing something interesting, comment on it.  You just never know where it will take you.

So there you go. Just some networking strategies to think about. Maybe you have your own, why not share these with us! I’m really excited and can’t wait to meet you all at NLS6!

 January 25, 2013  Posted by at 2:30 pm your nls6 Tagged with: , , ,  No Responses »
Dec 212012
 

There’s only 10 days to go until NLS6 Early Bird Registration closes on Monday 31 December 2012.

With only 10 days left until Early Bird Registration, and only a few days left until Christmas day, you’ll need to make sure that you don’t forget to register for NLS6 amidst all the busy-ness over the coming days.

Join us in Brisbane, Queensland for NLS6 in February 2013.

This ALIA New Graduates event, with discount prices for students and ALIA members, only takes place every two years.

This is a fantastic opportunity to meet other students, network with new graduates, collaborate with your peers, and connect with emerging leaders in the LIS profession.

  • Saturday 9th February is filled with an exciting array of workshops.
  • Sunday 10th and Monday 11th February are packed with inspiring keynote speakers and presenters.
  • Tuesday 12th February is your chance to explore the ALIA Info Online Trade Exhibition.

Click here to get your NLS6 registration underway.

NLS6 Early Bird Registrations close on 31 December 2012. Don’t miss out!

 December 21, 2012  Posted by at 9:00 am news, registration Tagged with: , ,  No Responses »
Dec 052012
 

Thought about how to present yourself as an information professional lately?

Today, we’re likely to be entities in ourselves. We’re not going to be with the one employer our entire career. A thoughtful and, dare I say it, strategic approach is required to build an identity (and brand) so that others in the profession and our professional networks or communities, may know who we are and what we (can) bring to the profession.

The terms ‘brand’ and ‘identity’ tend to be used synonymously when discussing or providing advice on building and managing a personal brand. I invite those keen to learn more to seek their own understandings of these terms. I may stir the pot here by saying they’re two different things.
Please, ponder it.

Building a professional identity doesn’t happen overnight. I’d go a far as saying we will constantly be shaping our professional identities. It’s not just about setting up a Twitter handle or Linkedin profile. I guess you can think of your professional identity as what is uniquely you as an information professional. What do you bring? Try thinking about your professional identity as a piece of a giant puzzle, this being the picture of the profession’s skills, knowledge and expertise. Okay, so you’re not going to know all of this straight away as a newbie to the profession. And I’m just putting ideas on the table here. But you may be eager to share your thoughts, reactions and ideas in the profession. That’s great! Different experiences provide a valuable source – alternative perspectives and understanding. Sharing your fresh thinking about LIS issues shed light on new knowledge, ways of doing things and approaches to challenges.

A professional identity is communicated via a brand, made up of reputation, identity and professional relationships. A brand is like a storefront. It encapsulates what it is you’d like others to see as your contribution, your piece of the puzzle. Communicating your identity takes place in the connections you develop and the contribution you make to your professional network of peers. You might have a Twitter account, a Facebook account, a blog, a Linkedin profile, may pin stuff on Pinterest or display your presentations on Slideshare. It is important to consider how all of these channels are presented, and how they can consistently communicate your professional identity.

The ‘Building and managing your professional identity’ workshop at NLS6 with Matthias Liffers and myself will provoke thought and discussion around the drivers for being in the online space and provide an opportunity to fine tune the use of professional networking tools.

Now try thinking about how your professional networking tools, what you’ve achieved and what you’re currently doing in your job or in the profession could come together and be presented on one website. Take it a step further. Show potential employers that you can create a web presence and build your own professional “home” site. Get your hands dirty with a full-day WordPress workshop presented by Kathryn Greenhill.

Participants have a little homework to do before the workshop. Kathryn explains this in a short video and it’s as hard as ordering a book through Amazon.com and as expensive as buying a cup of coffee a month. It involves buying hosting at bluehost.com and choosing a domain name. Participants will leave the workshop with their site configured and set up on the web. The setup will cost around $110 up front. Instructions will be provided, but it is essential to complete this a couple of days before the workshop.

Now in case you missed the useful resources above, here they are again to get you started.

Nov 302012
 

I give a shout out for answers to this tweet to my network on Twitter.

Quick #nls6 blog post crowd sourcing – PLN, why do you use Twitter? What value does a PLN &/or using Twitter bring to you as a professional? Thx!  -@acrystelle

Look what happened.

I probably never have to be the only person I know at a library conference ever again  – @siandart

Twitter = views, ideas, concepts fr outside own POW, different sectors, professions, countries. all keep me engaged & interested  – @flexnib

essential for note taking & networking during confs, way of staying in touch informally with PLN, water cooler chatting #twitter  – @newgradlib

good to easily keep up with industry happenings + brilliant for meeting new ppl in profession & maintaining network  – @ktaines

Opportunity to engage with and learn from others. Sharing knowledge and thoughts to strengthen the profession. #nls6  – @sallyheroes

Plus even more responses…

I know from experience that rockin’ up to a conference can be daunting, a bit like the first day of school. These thoughts come to mind – Will people like me? Who will I sit with? And oh no, what if I’m alone in the corner at morning tea? Or unable to make conversation with someone I’d really like to connect with?

The answer – start to build relationships and develop your professional voice ahead of time. But how? Here’s where the professional networking and discussion program aims to help.

THE IDEA
Basically, we’d like to encourage newbies to the profession and/or newbies to being in the professional online space to establish and build connections, engage in professional conversation and gain a sense of community prior to the symposium.

THE ‘HOW’
Okay, the grand plan is this. A program of professional networking and discussion will stem from the symposium workshop topics. A series of blog posts will provide an overview or viewpoint of the topic area; include details of the related workshops, and link to some resources to get you started with exploring the topics on your own (or with others!) Each ‘hot topic’ will be introduced on Twitter to start off the discussion. This will be followed by a blog post on the topic and some circulation of useful resources.

THE ‘CONVERSATION’
Making connections and facilitation of professional discussion throughout the program will be primarily via Twitter. Participants are encouraged to use both #nls6 and #hottopic hashtags in their tweets for others to follow along.

New to Twitter? No worries. Here are some resources to get you started.

Next, you’ll need people to follow. Building a group of professional LIS folk is simple. Start with a few, either from who you know or from your favourite library blogs, then look to see who they follow. From there, look to see who those people follow, and so on. See any of interest to you? Follow them.

There’s no shortage of Twitter folk willing to help others starting out in the online space. So give it a crack. Start building your professional voice, be involved, and get connected!

 November 30, 2012  Posted by at 11:00 am your nls6 Tagged with: , , , , , ,  No Responses »
Nov 022012
 
Eagle St Pier, Brisbane

 

Relaxing at the end of a long day of conferencing with a few cold ones is a great way to connect and catch up with your professional peers.  More than anything, it’s these unofficial little gatherings that serve to foster a real sense of community and help build professional relationships.

Below are some of my favourite Brisbane drinking establishments.  I’ve classified them by cruelly stereotyping their clientele – please forgive my political incorrectness!  All are within walking distance of the symposium venue.

 

Belgian Beer Cafe

The Belgian Beer Cafe is one of my favourite centrally-located pubs. No doubt due to the relatively expensive (but awesome!) selection of beers, the crowd is generally older and professional (think “Soccer moms” and BMW drivers!). If you want to enjoy some quality beer without having to deal with hordes of drunken kids, the Belgian Beer Cafe is highly recommended.

 

Jade Buddha

Located on Eagle Street, overlooking the river, Jade Buddha is perhaps somewhat of a “yuppie” bar. I would say its main clientele are business students and recent grads; the type of people who drive a ten year old Camry, but will tell you they drive a Porsche. The Jade Buddha has a great cocktail lounge, reasonable prices, and one of the best views of the city I’m aware of.

 

The Brisbane German Club

If you’re willing to venture a bit further from the symposium venue, I definitely recommend the German Club. Located on Vulture Street, opposite the Gabba, it has a wide selection of German beers, and isn’t nearly as crowded as CBD locations. If you like your beer in giant steins and don’t care about all that trendy overpriced cocktail stuff, the German Club is the place for you.

 

The QUT Guild Bar

The QUT Guild Bar is located on campus, and is scheduled to move to a fancy new building this year. It’s your typical on-campus bar, mostly occupied by binge-drinking undergraduates. You’ll be hard pressed to find a cheaper jug of beer in Brisbane, and if you can put up with the drunk students (don’t worry, they’re mostly harmless), it’s a fine place for afternoon beer and chips.

 

Irish Murphy’s

Irish Murphy’s, located on George Street in the CBD, is your standard Irish pub. With a mostly working class clientele, Irish Murphy’s comes across as the polar opposite of the Jade Budda. It has that unpretentious charm typical of drinking establishments of its kind. If you like traditional Irish pubs, Irish Murphy’s would be my pick.

 

The Rumpus Room

The Rumpus Room is located in West End, a trendy, gentrified, hipsterfied suburb a few minutes’ walk from South Bank. Like all establishments in West End (the Haight-Ashbury of Brisbane), its main clientele are art student types and “hipsters”. The atmosphere is laid-back and friendly. They have a fair variety of cocktails and ciders at a reasonable price.

 

While they are by no means the only places to grab a beer in Brisbane, any of these fine establishments will make a fine Brisbane meeting place. Bonus points if you visit all of them!

 November 2, 2012  Posted by at 3:00 pm out and about, reviews Tagged with: , , , ,  No Responses »
Oct 192012
 

The NLS6 team is committed to helping you keep your costs down so that you can maximise your symposium experience. That’s why we have created a space on the website where you connect with other delegates for the purpose of sharing accommodation.  Not only will you save money, you will also have the opportunity to make a new professional connection.

So –  Are you an NLS6 delegate looking for somewhere to stay during the symposium? Or perhaps you are planning to book a hotel room or holiday apartment and want to find someone to share accommodation and costs? Or what about those of you who are lucky enough to live in Brisbane – do you have accommodation to offer an NLS6 delegate?

If you answered ‘yes’ to any of the above, then the homestay classifieds system is for you!  You can get started right away or, if you prefer, you can check out the info and tips first.

 October 19, 2012  Posted by at 1:00 pm accommodation, your nls6 Tagged with: , , , ,  No Responses »
Oct 192012
 

eBooks. It seems everyone has something to say about them. Why do eBooks matter to libraries?  Should librarians in fact be breaking up with eBooks? While talk of eBooks is surely going to be happening over coffees at NLS6, perhaps we will be crying over their terrible treatment of us after sinking a few beers, one thing is certain. No matter what the format, there are books that make us laugh, books that make us cry and books that inspire us to do something. So while there is no doubt talking about eBooks with your peers at NLS could help you understand this complex issue, right now let’s just talk books, in particular books about Brisbane.

When I first moved to Brisbane someone gave me a copy of He Died with a Falafel in His Hand, John Birmingham’s epic house-sharing novel, particularly appropriate as I was living in a grungy group house at the time. This hilarious book and the craziness it details was my first introduction to the wonderful land of Brisbane literature and since then I have become a huge fan of many authors that write about this city. It was Nick Earls stories about living in the inner city in novels like Zigzag Street and Bachelor Kisses that made me explore my neighbourhood, and Rebecca Sparrow’s The Girl Most Likely made a whole new set of Brisbane suburbs seem cool. For a completely different take on Brisbane I stepped back in time with David Malouf’s Johnno which gave me a new insight into Brisbane and its history.

Brisbane, Brisneyland, Brisvegas, however you want to refer to it there is a book out there that will capture your heart and let you unlock a little piece of the city. A book that will make you feel like you are living in the sub-tropical heat with frangipani blooming outside your window as you sip, well, you get the idea.

So before you come to NLS6 and dive into discussions about eBooks, books and every other kind of resource libraries have to offer (including the librarians!) take some time to find a book about Brisbane that inspires you to have a look around another part of the city before or after the symposium. If you need some inspiration take a look at this list of books about Brisbane. And when you get here take some time to do the Albert St Literary walk in the city, this is an easy walk from NLS6 HQ,  it lets you see what other famous authors think about Brisbane, and best of all it’s free!

If you have any recommendations about books that explore Brisbane, please add a comment below and I look forward to speaking with you at NLS6 after you have delved into Brisbane fiction on whichever platform you choose.

Disclaimer: While NLS6 is promising to be a hell of a good time we cannot promise that it will live up to the debauchery portrayed in books such as He Died with a Falafel in His Hand, after all information professionals are a staid and serious lot aren’t we??? 😉

 October 19, 2012  Posted by at 11:00 am out and about, planning Tagged with: , , , ,  No Responses »