• Wikimedia Australia Wikimedia Australia
  • Ryan Donahue Ryan Donahue
  • Sue Gardner Sue Gardner
  • Ruth Kneale Ruth Kneale Ruth Kneale sponsored by the State Library of Queensland
  • Stuart Candy Stuart Candy Keynote Speaker, Dr Stuart Candy - Professional futurist
  • Ingrid Parent Ingrid Parent Ingrid Parent
  • Jenica Rogers Jenica Rogers Jenica Rogers sponsored by the State Library of Queensland
  • Marcus Foth Marcus Foth
  • NLS6 NLS6
Dec 182012
 

With so many thoughtful, creative and heartfelt entries for our $200AUD registration bursary, we’ve found it a real challenge to pick only three winners. Thank you to the anonymous donor who made these bursaries possible, and significantly helped three students come to NLS6. Thank you to everyone who entered.

Here are the winning statements*.

I need to attend NLS6 because …

  • 2013 is my year to be different.
  • it is simply the best opportunity for a distance student nearing graduation to network with peers, potential employers and mentors. NLS6 is looking to be a highlight of my 18 months study, and the milestone at the start of my career as a professional librarian.
  • this is the opportunity for me to kick-start my career. I want to make a career for myself and feel that NLS6 offers me a chance to learn, motivate, innovate and strive to achieve rewarding employment.

Our winners* are :

  • Anna Rotar
  • Anton Angelo
  • Elizabeth Wilcox

Congratulations. We look forward to seeing the three of you in Brisbane at NLS6 in February 2013.

If you missed out on these bursaries, don’t forget that there are still other bursaries available, as listed in our earlier blog post.

* Please note, statements and winners’ names are not necessarily listed in matching order.

 December 18, 2012  Posted by at 12:00 pm news, registration, your nls6 Tagged with: , , , ,  No Responses »
Dec 122012
 

Business. It’s not a dirty word.

No, it really isn’t.

I see people almost shudder at the word. This worries me. Maybe it’s a fear of the unknown, or maybe it is thought to be irrelevant to this profession. An awareness and understanding of how and why an organisation exists, what drives it and what makes it tick, is so important….to any profession. The information profession is no exemption.

There have been ideas floating about the last few years at least, relating to the ’21st century librarian’, the picture being painted with business skills in mind. Meredith Farkas identified ‘high level’ competencies such as project management skills, ability to ‘question and evaluate library services’ (analytical skills), ability to evaluate the needs of stakeholders (marketing), and the ability to ‘sell library services’ (targeted marketing communication) among technology related competencies.

Taking a step back, there are two documents that provide necessary insight to help align big ideas, projects and services to the organisation’s direction – the strategic plan and annual report. Indicators of objectives, resourcing plans and availability of funds can be found in these documents. So I suggest to get to know your organisation well and the ability to plan and evaluate projects in a way that shows value, I’d say will develop from there. Big ideas and an analytical mind extends beyond just library services, in my opinion, as almost certainly business processes can be made more effective or efficient, particularly when it comes to quality and risk management. Identifying ways that processes can be improved, or even how knowledge is distributed throughout the organisation can fill gaps in service delivery.

You’ll find a workshop on offer at NLS6 that will provide you with an understanding of key principles of these complementary skills, business skills and capabilties that can improve your chances of success in your role and beyond. Develop a set of skills that will set you apart and will assist your organisation deliver on its goals and objectives.

See the bigger picture. Get signed up for the business skills workshop with Cory Banks. Business and libraries, they’re not ‘chalk and cheese’.

LIScareer.com (author Susan Sloan) suggests strategies for cultivating leaderships skills and qualities. These include: –

  • knowing yourself
  • be a mentor
  • volunteer
  • embrace change
  • keep learning

Surely these help, but would these strategies really achieve what we understand as leadership? Do we know what it is? I’d say each person would have their own understanding as it relates to them, but that’s really complicating the issue, isn’t it? I’d also say leadership takes many forms, in many different settings or scenario. You don’t have to be at the top of an organisation to display leadership. Now enough from me, what does leadership mean to you?

Work towards a definition of leadership and identify tools and approaches to engage with these traits with the leadership workshop with Jenica Rogers.

Don’t forget early bird registrations close at the end of December! So get ahead, get down with business skills and leadership and book your spot now!

The role of business skills and leadership may not make sense now, but it will, it will fall into place and have you thinking about contributing to your organisation in a whole new way.

 December 12, 2012  Posted by at 10:30 am your nls6 Tagged with: , , , , , ,  No Responses »
Dec 052012
 

Thought about how to present yourself as an information professional lately?

Today, we’re likely to be entities in ourselves. We’re not going to be with the one employer our entire career. A thoughtful and, dare I say it, strategic approach is required to build an identity (and brand) so that others in the profession and our professional networks or communities, may know who we are and what we (can) bring to the profession.

The terms ‘brand’ and ‘identity’ tend to be used synonymously when discussing or providing advice on building and managing a personal brand. I invite those keen to learn more to seek their own understandings of these terms. I may stir the pot here by saying they’re two different things.
Please, ponder it.

Building a professional identity doesn’t happen overnight. I’d go a far as saying we will constantly be shaping our professional identities. It’s not just about setting up a Twitter handle or Linkedin profile. I guess you can think of your professional identity as what is uniquely you as an information professional. What do you bring? Try thinking about your professional identity as a piece of a giant puzzle, this being the picture of the profession’s skills, knowledge and expertise. Okay, so you’re not going to know all of this straight away as a newbie to the profession. And I’m just putting ideas on the table here. But you may be eager to share your thoughts, reactions and ideas in the profession. That’s great! Different experiences provide a valuable source – alternative perspectives and understanding. Sharing your fresh thinking about LIS issues shed light on new knowledge, ways of doing things and approaches to challenges.

A professional identity is communicated via a brand, made up of reputation, identity and professional relationships. A brand is like a storefront. It encapsulates what it is you’d like others to see as your contribution, your piece of the puzzle. Communicating your identity takes place in the connections you develop and the contribution you make to your professional network of peers. You might have a Twitter account, a Facebook account, a blog, a Linkedin profile, may pin stuff on Pinterest or display your presentations on Slideshare. It is important to consider how all of these channels are presented, and how they can consistently communicate your professional identity.

The ‘Building and managing your professional identity’ workshop at NLS6 with Matthias Liffers and myself will provoke thought and discussion around the drivers for being in the online space and provide an opportunity to fine tune the use of professional networking tools.

Now try thinking about how your professional networking tools, what you’ve achieved and what you’re currently doing in your job or in the profession could come together and be presented on one website. Take it a step further. Show potential employers that you can create a web presence and build your own professional “home” site. Get your hands dirty with a full-day WordPress workshop presented by Kathryn Greenhill.

Participants have a little homework to do before the workshop. Kathryn explains this in a short video and it’s as hard as ordering a book through Amazon.com and as expensive as buying a cup of coffee a month. It involves buying hosting at bluehost.com and choosing a domain name. Participants will leave the workshop with their site configured and set up on the web. The setup will cost around $110 up front. Instructions will be provided, but it is essential to complete this a couple of days before the workshop.

Now in case you missed the useful resources above, here they are again to get you started.

Dec 022012
 

You won’t regret your decision to join us at NLS6 in February 2013.

This is a professional development opportunity you don’t want to miss.

The line-up of keynote speakers is amazing. The range of workshops is awesome. The diversity of presentations is inspiring.

Give yourself the best present for your professional development this Christmas – make a commitment to your future.

Take the plunge. Register now. Don’t miss out.

Earlybird registrations for NLS6 close at midnight (AEST Brisbane) on 31 December 2012.

 

 December 2, 2012  Posted by at 6:00 pm your nls6 Tagged with: , ,  No Responses »
Nov 302012
 

I give a shout out for answers to this tweet to my network on Twitter.

Quick #nls6 blog post crowd sourcing – PLN, why do you use Twitter? What value does a PLN &/or using Twitter bring to you as a professional? Thx!  -@acrystelle

Look what happened.

I probably never have to be the only person I know at a library conference ever again  – @siandart

Twitter = views, ideas, concepts fr outside own POW, different sectors, professions, countries. all keep me engaged & interested  – @flexnib

essential for note taking & networking during confs, way of staying in touch informally with PLN, water cooler chatting #twitter  – @newgradlib

good to easily keep up with industry happenings + brilliant for meeting new ppl in profession & maintaining network  – @ktaines

Opportunity to engage with and learn from others. Sharing knowledge and thoughts to strengthen the profession. #nls6  – @sallyheroes

Plus even more responses…

I know from experience that rockin’ up to a conference can be daunting, a bit like the first day of school. These thoughts come to mind – Will people like me? Who will I sit with? And oh no, what if I’m alone in the corner at morning tea? Or unable to make conversation with someone I’d really like to connect with?

The answer – start to build relationships and develop your professional voice ahead of time. But how? Here’s where the professional networking and discussion program aims to help.

THE IDEA
Basically, we’d like to encourage newbies to the profession and/or newbies to being in the professional online space to establish and build connections, engage in professional conversation and gain a sense of community prior to the symposium.

THE ‘HOW’
Okay, the grand plan is this. A program of professional networking and discussion will stem from the symposium workshop topics. A series of blog posts will provide an overview or viewpoint of the topic area; include details of the related workshops, and link to some resources to get you started with exploring the topics on your own (or with others!) Each ‘hot topic’ will be introduced on Twitter to start off the discussion. This will be followed by a blog post on the topic and some circulation of useful resources.

THE ‘CONVERSATION’
Making connections and facilitation of professional discussion throughout the program will be primarily via Twitter. Participants are encouraged to use both #nls6 and #hottopic hashtags in their tweets for others to follow along.

New to Twitter? No worries. Here are some resources to get you started.

Next, you’ll need people to follow. Building a group of professional LIS folk is simple. Start with a few, either from who you know or from your favourite library blogs, then look to see who they follow. From there, look to see who those people follow, and so on. See any of interest to you? Follow them.

There’s no shortage of Twitter folk willing to help others starting out in the online space. So give it a crack. Start building your professional voice, be involved, and get connected!

 November 30, 2012  Posted by at 11:00 am your nls6 Tagged with: , , , , , ,  No Responses »
Nov 292012
 

Preceding NLS6 is a full day of workshops on Saturday February 9th 2013, covering a wide array of topics, from leadership to research, from copyright to social media, from professional identity to design thinking.

With so many topics, how do you choose? Do yourself a favour and sit down to consider your options rather than leave it crazily until the last minute to make your decision.

Head to the program page of the website. Use the ‘Switch Schedule’ filter to switch from Symposium to Workshops view. There’s six streams of workshops. Click on a session title to find out more about each workshop’s content.

Making choices #1

First up, choose between:

  1. a full day option – now you have narrowed down to two choices; or
  2. two half day options – now you have narrowed to two workshops from a line-up of four (morning) and four (afternoon).

A full day gives you a whole day to explore a topic, bond with the other participants, get practical experience and immerse yourself in topic. By contrast, the half-day workshops give you a chance to try your hand at two completely different topics.

Now you’ve narrowed your choices, it should be easier to make a decision right?

Making choices #2

Reflect on why are you coming to NLS6. Sure, there will be plenty of reasons why you’re joining us, but focus on your core reason.

Are you focused on strengthening your professional identity? Are you coming to expand your technical skills? Are you exploring new ways of looking at social media?

Pick a topic that scares you. Pick a topic that stretches you. Pick a topic that affirms why you do what you.

If you could have any job in the world, which workshop topic(s) would help you achieve it?

Still indecisive?

We didn’t promise to make it easy to choose, because we did promise you that this symposium would Be Different. The workshops will all be awesome. We’ll be showcasing the workshops over the coming weeks, so if you really can’t decide right away, then make sure you stay tuned to find out more.

 November 29, 2012  Posted by at 11:00 am planning, program, your nls6 Tagged with: , , , ,  No Responses »
Nov 162012
 

Handy information in your pocket. That’s what you want in a great travel app, isn’t it? Information to keep you moving, help make the most of an experience in a new place or assist with planning. I’m also a stickler for deriving the most value out of each dollar I spend on travel.

On my recent trip overseas I paid attention to the apps I used most often while on the go. The travel apps listed below are my top 5. These are the ones I referred to frequently for answers and tips, so you know these have been road-tested.

1. Evernote (free) – Okay, not travel specific but its versatility meant I could capture signs and directions to my iPhone, my immediate responses and reactions to experiences, which made for easier reflective writing later. After a day at the symposium, no doubt you’ll have invitations to social and networking opportunities in the evenings, so as soon as an idea strikes during the day, record it. You can return to it when you have the time. Rest easier knowing there’s no need to be distracted from your evening conversation because you’re too busy trying to remember what you thought about a discussion, a presentation or comment.

2. Urbanspoon (free) – By far the easiest way I found places to have brekky, lunch or dinner. (Recommendations from locals help also). But if you’re unfamiliar of a city and not sure what’s around the corner from your accommodation, Urbanspoon can help with places near to you, provide indications of price and what others thought about it.

3. Tripadvisor (free) – I don’t book accommodation without checking out reviews first on Tripadvisor. Get reviews and photos from real people on accommodation and attractions around the area. I used Tripadvisor to find popular attractions, and those in and around the neighbourhood I was staying. There’s also a website version, which I actually use most often. I tend to cross check reviews with another handy website – booking.com (there’s an app for that too!).

4. Lonely Planet City Guide ($4.49) – A small price but I wasn’t without a Lonely Planet City Guide on my recent trip. City Guides have essential information for your destination – information about getting around, as well as attractions and walking tours for exploring. I found the City Guide apps helped with ideas for what to do, where things were and planning my sight-seeing. Once downloaded, there are no additional data charges to access the content, great for roaming around.

5. Virgin Australia Flight Specials (free) – This one is probably the most useful airline app I’ve come across so far. Easy search for fares, you can even set up alerts to remind you to grab sale fares for the route to Brisbane or for your favourite destinations. Keep up to date with flight status, manage your booking and check-in for your flight. It’s one jam-packed app!

Other apps specific to Brisbane you can check out are: –

  • South Bank Pocket Guide (free)
  • Airtrain (free)
  • Black and White Cabs (free)
  • Yellow Cabs Brisbane (free)
  • QAGOMA – Queensland Art Gallery, Gallery of Modern Art (free)

The Experience team are here to support your planning for your NLS6. Get to know our team members to spot them at the symposium!
And remember, if you have any questions for the Experience team, please send your emails to experience@newlibrarianssymposium.com.

 November 16, 2012  Posted by at 12:00 pm planning, travel, your nls6 Tagged with: , , , , , ,  No Responses »
Nov 132012
 

We’ve launched three keynotes so far, Ruth Kneale, Jenica Rogers and Marcus Foth. We’ll be announcing other keynotes over the coming weeks. You’ll get to meet them all in Brisbane next February.

In the meantime, are there any questions you’d like to have answered by our first three keynotes before February 2013? Here’s your chance to let us know what you want to find out.

Do you want to know how Marcus felt when he was inducted into Planetizen as one of the world’s top 25 leading thinkers and innovators in the field of urban planning and technology?

Do want to know about Jenica’s reaction to being named a Mover & Shaker by Library Journal in 2009?

Do you want to know what it’s like for Ruth to work with astronomers across the United States of America as the Systems Librarian for ATST?

Want to know how they began their careers? Want to know why Ruth & Jenica chose to become librarians? Want to know why Marcus chose urban planning? Want to know their views on mentors? Want to know what they think about the future of scholarly publishing? Want to know if they still get nervous before public speaking?

My question is : What’s the one piece of advice you wish someone had given you as a student/new grad?

Send us your questions via Twitter (@alianls6) or leave a comment below. We’ll collate your questions, and find out the answers from our keynotes later this month.

 

 

 

 November 13, 2012  Posted by at 11:00 am program Tagged with: , , ,  No Responses »
Oct 312012
 

As a student or new graduate, there are some obvious personal benefits to attending NLS6 :

  • contribute to your own professional development
  • build your professional networks with other students, new graduates and potential managers (both Australians and Kiwis)
  • get enthused about your profession and have an amazing few days with the future faces of our industry

But how do you convince your boss? We have put together some resources to help you convince your employer that it is a worthwhile investment to support you to attend NLS6.

To secure funding from your employer you need first to do some research and put forward a watertight case that will prove it is in the interests of your organisation that you attend NLS6.

Mylee Joseph has some fantastic tips and leading questions to get you started Making a Case for Attending a Conference.

1. Research your organisation’s policies/procedures
What do you need to do to apply? Even if there isn’t a formal application process, you are more likely to succeed if you put in a formal application.

2. Research NLS
Look through the program and look for papers that are relevant to your role and/or your library.  Think about it from your managers perspective. Can you relate anything back to your own role/library.

3. What can you give back?
Few people are given Professional development funding without promising something in return. Don’t assume you can’t offer anything because you are in an entry level role – a fresh perspective can be invaluable.
Presentations to staff and reports on what you have learnt are often suggested or required, but think about what small project you could carry out that would have practical results:
– Build a wordpress site for your library after going to Kathryn Greenhill’s workshop
– Check your library’s copyright compliance after attending Ellen Broad’s workshop
– Investigate how your library could implement a virtual storytime with Michelle Collins and Regine Karantzas

4. Plan and budget
Draw up an approximate budget of what it will cost to attend NLS6: registration, accommodation, travel, food, taxis to/from airport. Check out the deals we have arranged and see if there are any sales online for nearby accommodation or travel.

ALA have provided a useful sample memo for attending conferences.  You can use this as inspiration or a base and amend this as needed to make your case to attend NLS6 (make sure you adjust it to NLS6 and to your own application). Access in Google Docs here.

Compromise
See your application as a negotiation process. If your manager can’t justify funding your entire NLS6 application, see if they can pay a section or even just give you conference leave (instead of annual leave) while you fund yourself. Recognise that you may have to put in some extra work outside of work hours to get your application ready and on your return fulfilling all those promises you made to get funding/leave.

Give it a go!
Many libraries will have a budget for staff professional development and it is always worth trying, there might be a bit left over that needs to be spent before the end of 2012!

Don’t lose hope. Putting in an application to attend NLS6 shows your managers that you are eager to develop your career and attend events and the next time you apply for something you might be successful.

Check out our other posts on tips for self funding and other funding possibilities.

 October 31, 2012  Posted by at 11:00 am planning, your nls6 Tagged with: , , , , ,  No Responses »
Aug 232012
 

Well we now have received all your proposals and EOI’s. Wow, what a bunch of awesome submissions! Thank you everyone.

There are so many submissions, on a diverse range of topics, from a whole range of sectors, that we will be spoilt for choice.  We are really looking forwarding to getting to the programming!  It will not be difficult to “be different”!

Our reviewers have now each been allocated a number of reviews and their comments have started coming in.  They are almost as excited as we are!

Keep an eye on the blog posts for updates.  We will be contacting all submitters via email once the reviews have all been received.

Now the fun begins!

 August 23, 2012  Posted by at 12:33 pm news, program, proposals Tagged with: , , , ,  No Responses »