• Wikimedia Australia Wikimedia Australia
  • Ryan Donahue Ryan Donahue
  • Sue Gardner Sue Gardner
  • Ruth Kneale Ruth Kneale Ruth Kneale sponsored by the State Library of Queensland
  • Stuart Candy Stuart Candy Keynote Speaker, Dr Stuart Candy - Professional futurist
  • Ingrid Parent Ingrid Parent Ingrid Parent
  • Jenica Rogers Jenica Rogers Jenica Rogers sponsored by the State Library of Queensland
  • Marcus Foth Marcus Foth
  • NLS6 NLS6
Feb 062013
 

Haven’t tweeted at a professional event before? Or just in need of a re-cap? Here’s your social media guide to NLS6.

Okay, the basics first.

Twitter

Key information and updates will be shared via @alianls6. Make sure you’re following us and we’d love to hear about your experience at NLS6!

The ‘conversation’

Engage with others in the sharing of ideas and content by using the hashtags #nls6sun and #nls6mon. These hashtags will be used throughout the 6th New Librarians’ Symposium, across all social media. You can even follow along by saving a search for #nls6 in your Twitter app. If you plan on live tweeting during NLS6, we’ve found these helpful tips.

 

Now for the super cool bits….

Capturing the #nls6 story

The #nls6 story will be captured at the end of each day using Storify. A link to the story will be provided via Twitter and embedded into blog posts so you can catch up on all the #nls6 shenanigans. So that makes it doubly important you use the #nls6 hashtag to be part of the story. Make your mark!

Snap and share your #nls6 experience

Get together, meet new people and share your pics of your #nls6 experience. Don’t forget to tag them with #nls6 when you post them online. Each afternoon, we’ll be selecting a ‘pic of the day’.

There will be plenty of Twitter folk handy at NLS6, no shortage willing to help others out with using Twitter. Here are a selection of folks to get you started – follow them to see what they’re up to at NLS6. Kick off a conversation, say ‘hi!’

Keynote speakers

Stuart Candy @futuryst

Ryan Donahue @RyanD

Marcus Foth @sunday9pm

Sue Gardner @SuePGardner

Ruth Kneale @desertlibrarian

Ingrid Parent @ingrid_parent

Jenica Rogers @jenica26

Workshop Presenters & Panelists

Katherine Howard @K1Howard

Eleanor Whitworth  @elewhitworth

Kathryn Greenhill @libsmatter

Kim Tairi @haikugirloz

Ellen Forsyth @ellenforsyth

Sue Hutley @suehutley

Mylee Joseph @myleejoseph

Margaret Warren @mawarre

 

And just in case you missed it, the hashtag is #nls6 😉

 February 6, 2013  Posted by at 11:00 am bits and pieces Tagged with: , , , , , , ,  No Responses »
Nov 302012
 

I give a shout out for answers to this tweet to my network on Twitter.

Quick #nls6 blog post crowd sourcing – PLN, why do you use Twitter? What value does a PLN &/or using Twitter bring to you as a professional? Thx!  -@acrystelle

Look what happened.

I probably never have to be the only person I know at a library conference ever again  – @siandart

Twitter = views, ideas, concepts fr outside own POW, different sectors, professions, countries. all keep me engaged & interested  – @flexnib

essential for note taking & networking during confs, way of staying in touch informally with PLN, water cooler chatting #twitter  – @newgradlib

good to easily keep up with industry happenings + brilliant for meeting new ppl in profession & maintaining network  – @ktaines

Opportunity to engage with and learn from others. Sharing knowledge and thoughts to strengthen the profession. #nls6  – @sallyheroes

Plus even more responses…

I know from experience that rockin’ up to a conference can be daunting, a bit like the first day of school. These thoughts come to mind – Will people like me? Who will I sit with? And oh no, what if I’m alone in the corner at morning tea? Or unable to make conversation with someone I’d really like to connect with?

The answer – start to build relationships and develop your professional voice ahead of time. But how? Here’s where the professional networking and discussion program aims to help.

THE IDEA
Basically, we’d like to encourage newbies to the profession and/or newbies to being in the professional online space to establish and build connections, engage in professional conversation and gain a sense of community prior to the symposium.

THE ‘HOW’
Okay, the grand plan is this. A program of professional networking and discussion will stem from the symposium workshop topics. A series of blog posts will provide an overview or viewpoint of the topic area; include details of the related workshops, and link to some resources to get you started with exploring the topics on your own (or with others!) Each ‘hot topic’ will be introduced on Twitter to start off the discussion. This will be followed by a blog post on the topic and some circulation of useful resources.

THE ‘CONVERSATION’
Making connections and facilitation of professional discussion throughout the program will be primarily via Twitter. Participants are encouraged to use both #nls6 and #hottopic hashtags in their tweets for others to follow along.

New to Twitter? No worries. Here are some resources to get you started.

Next, you’ll need people to follow. Building a group of professional LIS folk is simple. Start with a few, either from who you know or from your favourite library blogs, then look to see who they follow. From there, look to see who those people follow, and so on. See any of interest to you? Follow them.

There’s no shortage of Twitter folk willing to help others starting out in the online space. So give it a crack. Start building your professional voice, be involved, and get connected!

 November 30, 2012  Posted by at 11:00 am your nls6 Tagged with: , , , , , ,  No Responses »
Aug 022012
 

There are many reasons to speak at NLS6:

  • experience for your CV
  • get work to fund your conference registration
  • public speaking experience
  • help getting you over the line for that job/promotion
  • professional development

Speaking at NLS6 will help you with all this, but it will also be so much more. It will be something you are proud of; it will help you meet amazing people and make ongoing connections, and you might actually find that you enjoy it!

The 4th New Librarians Symposium (2008)

NLS4 coincided with my graduation as a librarian at the end of 2008. As I had attended a graduation ceremony for a previous degree, I decided along with some classmates, to spend the money attending NLS instead of the graduation ceremony. This was a decision I did not regret.

I worked for a conference organiser as a teenager so I have seen a lot of conferences from many professions. I was not expecting NLS to be the best conference I had seen. NLS is not a high budget event, you won’t get expensive goodie bags or fireworks or free champagne all night. What you will get is the most excited and engaged people in your profession all in one room. The people you meet and listen to present at NLS will be the future leaders of the industry inAustralia, and faster than you think.

NLS4 was a fantastic learning and social initiation and by the time NLS5 rolled around I thought I could attempt to present myself.

The 5th New Librarians Symposium (2011)

But what to talk about? I didn’t feel like an expert in anything, but as Alisa explained so eloquently you don’t need to know it all to teach others something.

You don’t need to reinvent the wheel if you can find a point of difference or a new perspective on an old problem. To take the pressure off I co-authored and co-presented a paper with colleagues but once I was there I realised that this was the most forgiving and interested audience. The audience wants you to succeed and wants to hear what you have to say and they will say nice things on twitter!

http://www.flickr.com/photos/mpfl/6191929594/

The 6th New Librarians’ Symposium (2013)

So what is my advice? Read the call for proposals carefully and brainstorm what you can offer that matches the theme: from work, research or personal professional experience. Talk to people about your ideas, talk to peers and mentors/managers. Get work on board if you can, if you make them see the benefit they may give you time release and/or support in your proposal.

And lastly, have fun! NLS6 isn’t a boring stuffy conference, so enjoy yourself and show your personality.  This is your future, this is an opportunity to give something back to your peers and your profession and whatever you give you will get back with interest: the professional experience and by creating a name for yourself and forging connections with the movers and shakers of Australia (and beyond)!

You have almost two weeks to get your initial proposal in.  You don’t need to have your talk perfectly planned by the 12th August, you need just up to 500 words or 3 minutes recorded to sell us the idea. What are you waiting for?!

 August 2, 2012  Posted by at 3:08 pm get involved, proposals Tagged with: , , , ,  No Responses »
Jul 202012
 
Seize this opportunity. Go for it.
For some people, just reading that top line will be enough for them to submit a proposal for the 6th New Librarians Symposium. I can tell you now I’m not one of those people. And I presented at last year’s New Librarians’ Symposium in Perth. If you’re a student or new graduate reading this, please read on. It may be the boost (or convincing) you need. Chances are you’re wondering “Can my idea really be accepted….?” Well, I’m here to tell you why you should submit.

First, let me tell you a story. I was in the same position in December 2010. Presenting wasn’t in my immediate plans. I thought I had nothing to say. Who would listen to me? But I had an idea and wondered, “How can I share this?” With some encouragement, okay it was more like a boot in the rear end, I submitted. I was stoked I even put together an abstract.

You only have to start, take the first step and the rest will follow.

Being a first-time presenter at an event like the New Librarians’ Symposium is like having training wheels on a bike as well as having a cheer squad behind you. The people who organise and attend the event create a buzzing atmosphere that only makes you want to jump onto that stage and give them your all. Such support and the connections you make in the friendliest of spaces on the national conference circuit are priceless and will probably become the most important to you during the course of your career.

Of course I was nervous, to be honest there’s not much that will change that…..did I look nervous?

Sure, I screwed up in the first few minutes when I had the wrong slide up on the screen. S*** happens. I laughed it off and kept going. And guess what? I wasn’t ready to come off the stage by the time I finished! On a serious note, presenting at a New Librarians’ Symposium is one of the few opportunities to start putting your name and ideas out there, to share and add to the knowledge of this profession, not to mention a shiny piece for your CV.

 

You have nothing to lose and everything to gain.

Thinking I’m an established professional? Nope. I’m a LIS masters student and only embarked on this career path a few years ago.

Following my experience at last year’s NLS, it’s time to pay it forward. I’m a Brissy local and co-chair of the Experience sub-committee on a mission to maximise your experience at the 6th New Librarians’ Symposium.

Not only can you expect a supportive Organising Committee, but the Experience team are also here to provide you with information about getting to Brisbane – you know, the “nitty-gritty, how do I get to the city from the airport?” kind of things to make your planning and participation experience to be as smooth and of best value as possible to you as a budding information professional.

The Experience team will have you revved up for NLS6 with an engaging and inspiring program of workshops on the Saturday, the day before NLS6 begins. In the lead up, we’ll be passing on travel deals, provide restaurant and accommodation reviews, and create opportunities to make connections with others and participate in discussions well before the event. Need to workout while you’re here? We’ve got you covered. We’ll find you the gyms in and around the CBD. Need gluten free options? No problem. The team will suss out catering restaurants. Need some help getting around QUT and the symposium program? We’ll have a team of volunteers you can approach. But what about drinks and tweet ups, you ask? Definitely no issues there. Social events will be planned closer to and during the event.

An “Ask the Experience team” mailbox will be set up shortly for you to start emailing your questions through.

So go on, have a crack. Who knows, right?

 July 20, 2012  Posted by at 10:54 am get involved, proposals Tagged with: , , ,  No Responses »
May 162012
 

One of the very first tasks for the NLS6 Organising Committee is locking in a range of awesome keynote speakers.

But in keeping with our Be different theme, we want to take a different approach to selecting speakers for keynote presentations and participants for panels.

This time round, we want you guys – the delegates-to-be – to tell us what you want to hear about and who you want to hear from.

We encourage you to think differently:

  • Think beyond the L in LIS. What’s happening in the broader information profession?
  • Think beyond the obvious three. It’s not just about academic, public and special libraries. Who inspires you in school libraries? Research libraries? Non-traditional library roles?
  • Think beyond a lecture. Our ‘keynote’ sessions don’t have to be traditional keynotes. Want to hear different people on the same topic? Suggest a panel, debate, or round of lightening talk keynotes.

You can suggest topics or people – we’re open to both.

Although we can’t promise stacks of big names from overseas, don’t limit your thinking at this point. As well as having people present in person at NLS6, we’re open to bringing some keynote presenters in virtually.

So let’s get a discussion going! Tell us what you think, either in the comments here, or by tweeting with the hashtag #mynls6. Have your say by COB Friday 25 May.

 May 16, 2012  Posted by at 10:00 am get involved, program Tagged with: , , ,  24 Responses »
Mar 092012
 

Interested in helping organise a spectacular New Librarians Symposium? Expressions of interest are now open!

How will the committee work?
The core Organising Committee will be a small group of no more than eight members, with specific roles for each member. We are looking for motivated, creative and collaborative people to lead in the following roles:

  • Sponsorship
  • Marketing
  • Website
  • Experience (tours, workshops, travel and social coordination)
  • Proposals and speaker liaison
  • Volunteers

Sub-committees
Each member of the Organising Committee will be responsible for chairing a sub-committee related to their role. Sub-committee chairs will be responsible for managing particular aspects of the event organisation and will report regularly to the wider Organising Committee.

Other opportunities to get involved
Not sure about joining the Organising Committee in a leadership role? We’re also looking for people to participate in sub-committees in each area.

In addition to roles on the Organising Committee and sub-committees, there will be numerous opportunities to get involved in shaping the direction of NLS6. We’ll be seeking input from potential delegates throughout the process, and delegates will even have the opportunity to help choose the content for the event.

Do I need to live in Brisbane?
No, the Organising Committee will be a virtual committee. Some roles may be better carried out by someone based in Brisbane, but there are plenty of ways for out-of-towners to contribute.

Who are you looking for?
New graduates, students, and others with an interest in new graduate issues. Members of the Organising Committee must also be personal members of ALIA or another related association.

We are looking for people who have the time and energy to commit to helping organise the event. If you’re interested in a role on the Organising Committee, it is important that you understand the nature of the role and that you will need to invest several hours each week in NLS6 activities.

What do I need to do?
Tell us how you’d like to help! We’re looking for expressions of interest for leadership roles in the Organising Committee and support roles in the sub-committees.

If you’re interested in taking part, we’d like you to identify a specific role on the Organising Committee or a particular sub-committee you’d like to join. Please submit an expression of interest related to your particular area of interest.

If you think of a key role we’ve left off the list, please let us know and express your interest in that role.

You are welcome to express interest in more than one role but please be aware that, due to the workload involved in organising an event like this, it is unlikely that you’ll be allocated more than one area of responsibility.

What do I include in my expression of interest?

Please include:

  • a short CV (no more than two pages)
  • one of the following:
    • a statement of interest in a particular role on the Organising Committee, including an outline of why you are interested in this position and an overview of the skills, knowledge and experience you will bring to the position (no more than one page) OR
    • a statement of interest in joining a particular sub-committee, including an outline of why you are interested in this sub-committee and an overview of the skills, knowledge and experience you will bring to the committee (no more than one page)
  • one of the following:
    • a statement of employer support for your participation on the Organising Committee or sub-committee, including an indication that you will be allowed to undertake some activities on work time OR
    • a statement indicating that you are willing and able to commit your personal time to committee duties over the next 12 months
  • a 100 word statement in response to the question “What would your ideal NLS look like?”

We encourage you to think beyond your experience working in the library and information professions when preparing your expression of interest. Draw on previous careers, committee involvement and any other relevant experience.

Submit your expression of interest by email to nls6.alia@gmail.com.nospam (remove .nospam) by midnight Friday 30 March (UPDATED).

Expressions of interest will be considered by a panel comprised of:

  • Kate Davis (NLS6 co-chair)
  • Vanessa Warren (NLS6 co-chair and NGAC chair)
  • Mel Chivers (NGG coordinator)
  • Christina Granata (ALIA Events Manager)

We’ll let you know the outcome of the process by the end of March.