• Wikimedia Australia Wikimedia Australia
  • Ryan Donahue Ryan Donahue
  • Sue Gardner Sue Gardner
  • Ruth Kneale Ruth Kneale Ruth Kneale sponsored by the State Library of Queensland
  • Stuart Candy Stuart Candy Keynote Speaker, Dr Stuart Candy - Professional futurist
  • Ingrid Parent Ingrid Parent Ingrid Parent
  • Jenica Rogers Jenica Rogers Jenica Rogers sponsored by the State Library of Queensland
  • Marcus Foth Marcus Foth
  • NLS6 NLS6
Feb 112013
 

We laughed.
We were inspired.
We are capable of leading the information profession.

One-liners like “Be bold with bananas” and “You people have mad skills” will (hopefully) empower us newbies to make the difference we want to see and make throughout our careers.

Catch up on the action from day one of the Sixth ALIA New Librarians Symposium.

 February 11, 2013  Posted by at 6:49 am your nls6 Tagged with: , , , ,  No Responses »
Dec 052012
 

Thought about how to present yourself as an information professional lately?

Today, we’re likely to be entities in ourselves. We’re not going to be with the one employer our entire career. A thoughtful and, dare I say it, strategic approach is required to build an identity (and brand) so that others in the profession and our professional networks or communities, may know who we are and what we (can) bring to the profession.

The terms ‘brand’ and ‘identity’ tend to be used synonymously when discussing or providing advice on building and managing a personal brand. I invite those keen to learn more to seek their own understandings of these terms. I may stir the pot here by saying they’re two different things.
Please, ponder it.

Building a professional identity doesn’t happen overnight. I’d go a far as saying we will constantly be shaping our professional identities. It’s not just about setting up a Twitter handle or Linkedin profile. I guess you can think of your professional identity as what is uniquely you as an information professional. What do you bring? Try thinking about your professional identity as a piece of a giant puzzle, this being the picture of the profession’s skills, knowledge and expertise. Okay, so you’re not going to know all of this straight away as a newbie to the profession. And I’m just putting ideas on the table here. But you may be eager to share your thoughts, reactions and ideas in the profession. That’s great! Different experiences provide a valuable source – alternative perspectives and understanding. Sharing your fresh thinking about LIS issues shed light on new knowledge, ways of doing things and approaches to challenges.

A professional identity is communicated via a brand, made up of reputation, identity and professional relationships. A brand is like a storefront. It encapsulates what it is you’d like others to see as your contribution, your piece of the puzzle. Communicating your identity takes place in the connections you develop and the contribution you make to your professional network of peers. You might have a Twitter account, a Facebook account, a blog, a Linkedin profile, may pin stuff on Pinterest or display your presentations on Slideshare. It is important to consider how all of these channels are presented, and how they can consistently communicate your professional identity.

The ‘Building and managing your professional identity’ workshop at NLS6 with Matthias Liffers and myself will provoke thought and discussion around the drivers for being in the online space and provide an opportunity to fine tune the use of professional networking tools.

Now try thinking about how your professional networking tools, what you’ve achieved and what you’re currently doing in your job or in the profession could come together and be presented on one website. Take it a step further. Show potential employers that you can create a web presence and build your own professional “home” site. Get your hands dirty with a full-day WordPress workshop presented by Kathryn Greenhill.

Participants have a little homework to do before the workshop. Kathryn explains this in a short video and it’s as hard as ordering a book through Amazon.com and as expensive as buying a cup of coffee a month. It involves buying hosting at bluehost.com and choosing a domain name. Participants will leave the workshop with their site configured and set up on the web. The setup will cost around $110 up front. Instructions will be provided, but it is essential to complete this a couple of days before the workshop.

Now in case you missed the useful resources above, here they are again to get you started.

Nov 302012
 

I give a shout out for answers to this tweet to my network on Twitter.

Quick #nls6 blog post crowd sourcing – PLN, why do you use Twitter? What value does a PLN &/or using Twitter bring to you as a professional? Thx!  -@acrystelle

Look what happened.

I probably never have to be the only person I know at a library conference ever again  – @siandart

Twitter = views, ideas, concepts fr outside own POW, different sectors, professions, countries. all keep me engaged & interested  – @flexnib

essential for note taking & networking during confs, way of staying in touch informally with PLN, water cooler chatting #twitter  – @newgradlib

good to easily keep up with industry happenings + brilliant for meeting new ppl in profession & maintaining network  – @ktaines

Opportunity to engage with and learn from others. Sharing knowledge and thoughts to strengthen the profession. #nls6  – @sallyheroes

Plus even more responses…

I know from experience that rockin’ up to a conference can be daunting, a bit like the first day of school. These thoughts come to mind – Will people like me? Who will I sit with? And oh no, what if I’m alone in the corner at morning tea? Or unable to make conversation with someone I’d really like to connect with?

The answer – start to build relationships and develop your professional voice ahead of time. But how? Here’s where the professional networking and discussion program aims to help.

THE IDEA
Basically, we’d like to encourage newbies to the profession and/or newbies to being in the professional online space to establish and build connections, engage in professional conversation and gain a sense of community prior to the symposium.

THE ‘HOW’
Okay, the grand plan is this. A program of professional networking and discussion will stem from the symposium workshop topics. A series of blog posts will provide an overview or viewpoint of the topic area; include details of the related workshops, and link to some resources to get you started with exploring the topics on your own (or with others!) Each ‘hot topic’ will be introduced on Twitter to start off the discussion. This will be followed by a blog post on the topic and some circulation of useful resources.

THE ‘CONVERSATION’
Making connections and facilitation of professional discussion throughout the program will be primarily via Twitter. Participants are encouraged to use both #nls6 and #hottopic hashtags in their tweets for others to follow along.

New to Twitter? No worries. Here are some resources to get you started.

Next, you’ll need people to follow. Building a group of professional LIS folk is simple. Start with a few, either from who you know or from your favourite library blogs, then look to see who they follow. From there, look to see who those people follow, and so on. See any of interest to you? Follow them.

There’s no shortage of Twitter folk willing to help others starting out in the online space. So give it a crack. Start building your professional voice, be involved, and get connected!

 November 30, 2012  Posted by at 11:00 am your nls6 Tagged with: , , , , , ,  No Responses »
Nov 162012
 

Handy information in your pocket. That’s what you want in a great travel app, isn’t it? Information to keep you moving, help make the most of an experience in a new place or assist with planning. I’m also a stickler for deriving the most value out of each dollar I spend on travel.

On my recent trip overseas I paid attention to the apps I used most often while on the go. The travel apps listed below are my top 5. These are the ones I referred to frequently for answers and tips, so you know these have been road-tested.

1. Evernote (free) – Okay, not travel specific but its versatility meant I could capture signs and directions to my iPhone, my immediate responses and reactions to experiences, which made for easier reflective writing later. After a day at the symposium, no doubt you’ll have invitations to social and networking opportunities in the evenings, so as soon as an idea strikes during the day, record it. You can return to it when you have the time. Rest easier knowing there’s no need to be distracted from your evening conversation because you’re too busy trying to remember what you thought about a discussion, a presentation or comment.

2. Urbanspoon (free) – By far the easiest way I found places to have brekky, lunch or dinner. (Recommendations from locals help also). But if you’re unfamiliar of a city and not sure what’s around the corner from your accommodation, Urbanspoon can help with places near to you, provide indications of price and what others thought about it.

3. Tripadvisor (free) – I don’t book accommodation without checking out reviews first on Tripadvisor. Get reviews and photos from real people on accommodation and attractions around the area. I used Tripadvisor to find popular attractions, and those in and around the neighbourhood I was staying. There’s also a website version, which I actually use most often. I tend to cross check reviews with another handy website – booking.com (there’s an app for that too!).

4. Lonely Planet City Guide ($4.49) – A small price but I wasn’t without a Lonely Planet City Guide on my recent trip. City Guides have essential information for your destination – information about getting around, as well as attractions and walking tours for exploring. I found the City Guide apps helped with ideas for what to do, where things were and planning my sight-seeing. Once downloaded, there are no additional data charges to access the content, great for roaming around.

5. Virgin Australia Flight Specials (free) – This one is probably the most useful airline app I’ve come across so far. Easy search for fares, you can even set up alerts to remind you to grab sale fares for the route to Brisbane or for your favourite destinations. Keep up to date with flight status, manage your booking and check-in for your flight. It’s one jam-packed app!

Other apps specific to Brisbane you can check out are: –

  • South Bank Pocket Guide (free)
  • Airtrain (free)
  • Black and White Cabs (free)
  • Yellow Cabs Brisbane (free)
  • QAGOMA – Queensland Art Gallery, Gallery of Modern Art (free)

The Experience team are here to support your planning for your NLS6. Get to know our team members to spot them at the symposium!
And remember, if you have any questions for the Experience team, please send your emails to experience@newlibrarianssymposium.com.

 November 16, 2012  Posted by at 12:00 pm planning, travel, your nls6 Tagged with: , , , , , ,  No Responses »
Nov 022012
 
Eagle St Pier, Brisbane

 

Relaxing at the end of a long day of conferencing with a few cold ones is a great way to connect and catch up with your professional peers.  More than anything, it’s these unofficial little gatherings that serve to foster a real sense of community and help build professional relationships.

Below are some of my favourite Brisbane drinking establishments.  I’ve classified them by cruelly stereotyping their clientele – please forgive my political incorrectness!  All are within walking distance of the symposium venue.

 

Belgian Beer Cafe

The Belgian Beer Cafe is one of my favourite centrally-located pubs. No doubt due to the relatively expensive (but awesome!) selection of beers, the crowd is generally older and professional (think “Soccer moms” and BMW drivers!). If you want to enjoy some quality beer without having to deal with hordes of drunken kids, the Belgian Beer Cafe is highly recommended.

 

Jade Buddha

Located on Eagle Street, overlooking the river, Jade Buddha is perhaps somewhat of a “yuppie” bar. I would say its main clientele are business students and recent grads; the type of people who drive a ten year old Camry, but will tell you they drive a Porsche. The Jade Buddha has a great cocktail lounge, reasonable prices, and one of the best views of the city I’m aware of.

 

The Brisbane German Club

If you’re willing to venture a bit further from the symposium venue, I definitely recommend the German Club. Located on Vulture Street, opposite the Gabba, it has a wide selection of German beers, and isn’t nearly as crowded as CBD locations. If you like your beer in giant steins and don’t care about all that trendy overpriced cocktail stuff, the German Club is the place for you.

 

The QUT Guild Bar

The QUT Guild Bar is located on campus, and is scheduled to move to a fancy new building this year. It’s your typical on-campus bar, mostly occupied by binge-drinking undergraduates. You’ll be hard pressed to find a cheaper jug of beer in Brisbane, and if you can put up with the drunk students (don’t worry, they’re mostly harmless), it’s a fine place for afternoon beer and chips.

 

Irish Murphy’s

Irish Murphy’s, located on George Street in the CBD, is your standard Irish pub. With a mostly working class clientele, Irish Murphy’s comes across as the polar opposite of the Jade Budda. It has that unpretentious charm typical of drinking establishments of its kind. If you like traditional Irish pubs, Irish Murphy’s would be my pick.

 

The Rumpus Room

The Rumpus Room is located in West End, a trendy, gentrified, hipsterfied suburb a few minutes’ walk from South Bank. Like all establishments in West End (the Haight-Ashbury of Brisbane), its main clientele are art student types and “hipsters”. The atmosphere is laid-back and friendly. They have a fair variety of cocktails and ciders at a reasonable price.

 

While they are by no means the only places to grab a beer in Brisbane, any of these fine establishments will make a fine Brisbane meeting place. Bonus points if you visit all of them!

 November 2, 2012  Posted by at 3:00 pm out and about, reviews Tagged with: , , , ,  No Responses »
Oct 302012
 

So you’ve made the call to attend NLS6, and now you’re looking for creative ways to find funding to help out with costs. To help you on your way, I’ve asked previous NLS attendees for their ideas about how to make your NLS6 happen if funds are the only things standing in your way. Hana W is based in Wellington (New Zealand). Kim T is based in Melbourne (Australia). Both attended NLS5 in Perth (2011).

Hana : I attended one day of NLS5 after I attended & presented at ALIA Libtec in 2011. I used funding awarded from my regional LIANZA committee, Te Upoko o te Ika a Maui, and to get to Perth I received funding from my employer.

Kim : I was already attending ALIA National Library & Information Technicians Conference and was fortunate that my workplace allowed me to stay for both. It is worth considering sharing accommodation with someone you know who is attending if possible.

Hana : If you are funding yourself, I’d suggest staying at a backpackers close to the conference venue (I stayed at a local backpackers down the road from NLS5 venue).

For the Australian-based folks, here’s some ideas for keeping your costs low :

  • Keep in touch with other new grads in the ALIA New Graduates Group, to find out who else is going to NLS6 from your region to share travel and/or accommodation with.
  • Find out if you are eligible for one of the ALIA Awards.
  • If you are currently working, then approach your employer about partially paying for some of your costs. Be creative with your pitch, and maybe they could cover your accommodation, or your flights, or your registration costs.

For the New Zealand-based folks, here’s some suggestions about sourcing funding from Hana :

  • Apply to your employer. Yes, it means crafting a well written and convincing application, but it is worth it.
  • Apply to your local LIANZA regional committee for the Hydestor award.
  • Check with your local LIANZA committee if they have any discretionary funding for professional development opportunities.
  • Apply for the Ada Fache fund if applicable.

You might also find that there are funding sources outside of your library sphere. Do you belong to other groups that have funding grants?  Are you a student of an institution that offers travel grants? Does anyone in your family belong to Lions or Rotary groups? Are you an member of another professional body that offers professional development grants? Now is the time to cast your net wide so that you can join us at NLS6.

Image of Hana WHana W is based in Wellington, New Zealand. She is a self confessed library geek, as proven by her blog, Library.Geek. She’s @thewhaanga. She’s the former editor of LIANZA’s Library Life.

 

 

 

Image of Kim TKim T is a crafter, maker and runner based in Melbourne, Australia. She is the Manager, Hawthorn Campus Library at Swinburne University. She’s @haikugirlOz and an Aurora alumni.

 October 30, 2012  Posted by at 11:00 am accommodation, travel, your nls6 Tagged with: , , , , ,  No Responses »
Oct 192012
 

eBooks. It seems everyone has something to say about them. Why do eBooks matter to libraries?  Should librarians in fact be breaking up with eBooks? While talk of eBooks is surely going to be happening over coffees at NLS6, perhaps we will be crying over their terrible treatment of us after sinking a few beers, one thing is certain. No matter what the format, there are books that make us laugh, books that make us cry and books that inspire us to do something. So while there is no doubt talking about eBooks with your peers at NLS could help you understand this complex issue, right now let’s just talk books, in particular books about Brisbane.

When I first moved to Brisbane someone gave me a copy of He Died with a Falafel in His Hand, John Birmingham’s epic house-sharing novel, particularly appropriate as I was living in a grungy group house at the time. This hilarious book and the craziness it details was my first introduction to the wonderful land of Brisbane literature and since then I have become a huge fan of many authors that write about this city. It was Nick Earls stories about living in the inner city in novels like Zigzag Street and Bachelor Kisses that made me explore my neighbourhood, and Rebecca Sparrow’s The Girl Most Likely made a whole new set of Brisbane suburbs seem cool. For a completely different take on Brisbane I stepped back in time with David Malouf’s Johnno which gave me a new insight into Brisbane and its history.

Brisbane, Brisneyland, Brisvegas, however you want to refer to it there is a book out there that will capture your heart and let you unlock a little piece of the city. A book that will make you feel like you are living in the sub-tropical heat with frangipani blooming outside your window as you sip, well, you get the idea.

So before you come to NLS6 and dive into discussions about eBooks, books and every other kind of resource libraries have to offer (including the librarians!) take some time to find a book about Brisbane that inspires you to have a look around another part of the city before or after the symposium. If you need some inspiration take a look at this list of books about Brisbane. And when you get here take some time to do the Albert St Literary walk in the city, this is an easy walk from NLS6 HQ,  it lets you see what other famous authors think about Brisbane, and best of all it’s free!

If you have any recommendations about books that explore Brisbane, please add a comment below and I look forward to speaking with you at NLS6 after you have delved into Brisbane fiction on whichever platform you choose.

Disclaimer: While NLS6 is promising to be a hell of a good time we cannot promise that it will live up to the debauchery portrayed in books such as He Died with a Falafel in His Hand, after all information professionals are a staid and serious lot aren’t we??? 😉

 October 19, 2012  Posted by at 11:00 am out and about, planning Tagged with: , , , ,  No Responses »
Oct 082012
 

The Experience team is pleased to announce the Oaks Hotels & Resorts group as the ‘preferred’ apartment option for NLS6. All Oaks Brisbane properties offer 4 ½ star, one and two bedroom fully self contained apartments with private balconies, separate lounge, dining, full kitchen and laundry facilities. Rooms include broadband connectivity, DVD / stereo, telephones, fitness room /gymnasium, lap pool, sauna, spa and BBQ facilities. The properties are in ideal locations situated just minutes from all that Brisbane has to offer.

I have stayed at iStay River City and our very own Kate Davis has stayed at 212 Margaret and we are both confident that you will feel right at home in any of the Oaks properties.

All NLS6 delegates are eligible for a 5% discount on accommodation at Brisbane Oaks Hotels & Resorts for the duration of the symposium.  To ensure that you receive the discount place your booking through the NLS6 booking portal.  The rooms will be subject to availability and the rates will fluctuate based on demand.  Delegates should also be aware of the website’s terms and conditions.

 October 8, 2012  Posted by at 9:00 am accommodation, your nls6 Tagged with: , , , ,  No Responses »
Oct 052012
 

The experience team knows that accommodation will be an important part of your overall symposium experience. We know that a lot of you will be unfamiliar with Brisbane and you probably won’t have time to come up here to check things out for yourself before hand. We also know that a lot of you won’t know anyone else who is attending and will be looking forward to meeting and socialising with new people.

That’s why the experience team are choosing ‘preferred’ accommodation venues: one backpackers’ hostel and one hotel/apartment. I, on behalf of the experience team, have popped in to a couple of venues and had a look around for you. I’ve also been working hard to arrange great discounts for NLS6 delegates. My aim is to streamline the booking process for you and maximize the potential for you to socialize and meet other delegates at your accommodation site.

Brisbane City YHA street viewNow, without further adieu, myself and the NLS6 experience team is proud to announce the symposium’s preferred backpacker accommodation venue* – the Brisbane City YHA. Chosen as ‘Best Backpacker Accommodation’ at the 2011 Queensland Tourism Awards and newly renovated in 2009, the YHA is the ideal home-away-from-home for budget savvy travellers.

The Brisbane City YHA offers a mix of four- and six-share dorms, some with ensuite and some with shared bathrooms. Private twin and double rooms (again, some with ensuite and some with shared bathrooms) can also be booked. Disabled facilities are available – please contact the YHA directly for details.

While staying at the YHA, guests can enjoy a barista style coffee and cooked breakfast at the Drifter’s Café in the morning and return in the evening for happy hour drink discounts between 5-6 pm. Or if you prefer to self-cater, there is a fully ‘kitted-out’ commercial-style kitchen with outdoor patio and city views. The Coles grocery store is a short walk away in The Barracks shopping centre on Petrie Terrace.

The Brisbane City YHA is located about 600m from Roma Street Station and about 2km from QUT Gardens Point. It is about a 20 minute walk to QUT or, if you prefer, a 10 minute bus ride from Roma Street Station. Alternatively, if you’re feeling energetic, you could hire a push bike at the hostel and pedal your way to the symposium!

All symposium delegates are eligible for the YHA discount and Groups Coordinator, Sarah Schatz, is holding 80 beds and several private rooms (both ensuite and with shared bathroom) exclusively for NLS6. However, she is only able to hold these beds for six weeks from when registrations open.

So what are you waiting for? Ring Sarah on 07 3236 1004 or email brisbanecitygroups@yha.com.au to secure your accommodation today. Make sure you advise Sarah that you are with NLS6 so that she can offer you the YHA discount.

Please note that delegates are responsible for their own booking and payment. Anyone booking at the YHA should ensure that they are familiar with the cancellation policy and any other terms and conditions.

Contact:
Sarah Schatz, Groups Coordinator
BrisbaneCity YHA
392 Upper Roma StBrisbaneQLD 4000
Phone: 07 3236 1004
brisbanecitygroups@yha.com.au
www.yha.com.au

 


* Don’t worry – for those of you who are not interested in staying in a backpackers’ hostel, the preferred hotel/apartment venue is coming soon!

 October 5, 2012  Posted by at 9:00 am accommodation, your nls6 Tagged with: , , , ,  No Responses »
Sep 282012
 

As a student, I struggle with spending time on things I want to do for fun, and things I should do for professional development. Fortunately, some things fit both categories! The New Librarians Symposium is full of fresh ideas, memorable presentations, and people who are doing amazing things in the industry. NLS5 was the first professional library event I attended, so perhaps I’m biased, but it will be difficult for other conferences to live up to my memory of it. I was excited, overwhelmed, and more than a little awed by the sheer number of awesome people in one place.

The banner that greeted me at NLS5A year on, I can barely recall the venue or the food; that’s okay, because that’s not what NLS is about. I made new friends, learned new things, networked, and contributed to the Twitter back channel. The lectures I’d attended at QUT had given me some idea of the breadth of roles available in libraries, but NLS5 made it clear just how limitless my options would be. I was surrounded by real librarians, and their jobs sounded interesting, challenging, and meaningful.

The  2011 keynote speaker lineup was a who’s who in libraryland: Mal Booth, Kate Davis, Kathryn Greenhill, and – all the way from the US – David Lee King. The plenary addresses were given by Sam Hughes, the children’s librarian at WA State Library, and Garry Conroy-Cooper, a man everybody wants to work for. I have come to know and respect these people, and their work, in the past year. What’s so amazing (aside from Sam’s ability to lead a ballroom of adults in a rendition of Twinkle Twinkle) was the immediacy of what the speakers had to say.

Because NLS is a symposium, not a conference, there’s less lead time in submitting and selecting presentations. This means that topics are fresh. Instead of hearing about tired concepts and technology, you can learn what’s hot, right now. And NLS is not strictly for managers, or experienced librarians — it’s for you! You can go home, brimming with enthusiasm, and put those ideas to work.

I attended a workshop prior to the symposium, How to get THE job, and got some great tips. By the close of NLS5, I was feeling so confident and enthusiastic, I asked Steve McQuade if I could come to the State Library of WA and do my practicum. He said yes! Those two weeks were among the best in my two-year journey to becoming a qualified librarian. You never know where the connections you’ll make at NLS will lead.

If the calibre of the speakers at NLS5 is anything to go by, you’ll be blown away at next year’s symposium. Trust me, you don’t want to miss out on all the fun. Go on, be different – at NLS6!

 

Julia Garnett is the 2011 winner of ALIA’s New Generation Advisory Committee (NGAC) competition for free registration to NLS5. She is in her final semester of the LIS program at QUT, and can’t wait to blend her love of technology, books, research, and the community in her first role as a librarian. When she’s not reading on her Kindle, you can catch her singing, blogging, or learning hip hop.

Julia, @jzgarnett

 

 

 September 28, 2012  Posted by at 11:00 am get involved Tagged with: , , ,  No Responses »