• Wikimedia Australia Wikimedia Australia
  • Ryan Donahue Ryan Donahue
  • Sue Gardner Sue Gardner
  • Ruth Kneale Ruth Kneale Ruth Kneale sponsored by the State Library of Queensland
  • Stuart Candy Stuart Candy Keynote Speaker, Dr Stuart Candy - Professional futurist
  • Ingrid Parent Ingrid Parent Ingrid Parent
  • Jenica Rogers Jenica Rogers Jenica Rogers sponsored by the State Library of Queensland
  • Marcus Foth Marcus Foth
  • NLS6 NLS6
Dec 172012
 

In addition to Jenica Rogers, Ruth Kneale, Ingrid Parent, and Marcus Foth, we’re pleased to be introducing our fifth keynote for NLS6 – Stuart Candy.

Dr Stuart Candy is a professional futurist with a design twist. He helps people engage more creatively and systematically with the worlds they could find themselves in, and generate ways to shape them. He currently works as regional Foresight and Innovation Leader for the global design and engineering firm Arup.

Stuart holds a Ph.D. in political science for pioneering work on ‘experiential futures’, designed immersions as a catalyst for more effective strategic conversation. His writing on this and other topics can be found at The Sceptical Futuryst.

When we asked Stuart, what does it mean to you to ‘be different’, this was his response :

It has been said that all we know about the future is that it will be different. A futurist’s practice of stretching into that difference means having the courage to transition from the known, the comfortable and the familiar into something else – and helping others find a way to do likewise.

Read up on Stuart’s blog, follow him on Twitter (you’ll find him online @futuryst), and start planning all the questions you want to ask him.

Stuart, we’re really looking forward to seeing you at NLS6 in Brisbane in February 2013.

 December 17, 2012  Posted by at 11:00 am program Tagged with: , , , ,  No Responses »
Dec 032012
 

Are you a student who wants to go to NLS6? Will a bursary for registration costs make a real difference for you?

We’ve got great news! An anonymous donor has generously offered three $200AUD bursaries to make NLS6 accessible for students who might not otherwise be able to make it to Brisbane in 2013.

Entry is simple.

You must finish the statement – “I need to attend NLS6 because …”

Send your answers to helpanlsstudent@gmail.com

Answers must be submitted by midday (AEST – Brisbane) Friday 14 December 2012. Winners announced Tuesday 18 December 2012.

Conditions are simple.

You must be studying towards a LIS qualification – either part-time or full-time.
You must tell us where you are studying.
You agree that your statement can be published (anonymously) on our website.

Winning is simple.

A panel will decide on the three statements to win.
Each winner will receive $200AUD towards their registration costs.
If you have already registered for NLS6, we’ll reimburse you $200AUD if you win.

Want to help others to get to NLS6?

These bursaries have been made possible through the generosity of one anonymous donor. If you want to follow their lead, contact the NLS6 Marketing Team to discuss ways you can contribute towards getting your colleagues and students to NLS6. Email us on nls6@newlibrarianssymposium.com

Dec 022012
 

You won’t regret your decision to join us at NLS6 in February 2013.

This is a professional development opportunity you don’t want to miss.

The line-up of keynote speakers is amazing. The range of workshops is awesome. The diversity of presentations is inspiring.

Give yourself the best present for your professional development this Christmas – make a commitment to your future.

Take the plunge. Register now. Don’t miss out.

Earlybird registrations for NLS6 close at midnight (AEST Brisbane) on 31 December 2012.

 

 December 2, 2012  Posted by at 6:00 pm your nls6 Tagged with: , ,  No Responses »
Nov 302012
 

I give a shout out for answers to this tweet to my network on Twitter.

Quick #nls6 blog post crowd sourcing – PLN, why do you use Twitter? What value does a PLN &/or using Twitter bring to you as a professional? Thx!  -@acrystelle

Look what happened.

I probably never have to be the only person I know at a library conference ever again  – @siandart

Twitter = views, ideas, concepts fr outside own POW, different sectors, professions, countries. all keep me engaged & interested  – @flexnib

essential for note taking & networking during confs, way of staying in touch informally with PLN, water cooler chatting #twitter  – @newgradlib

good to easily keep up with industry happenings + brilliant for meeting new ppl in profession & maintaining network  – @ktaines

Opportunity to engage with and learn from others. Sharing knowledge and thoughts to strengthen the profession. #nls6  – @sallyheroes

Plus even more responses…

I know from experience that rockin’ up to a conference can be daunting, a bit like the first day of school. These thoughts come to mind – Will people like me? Who will I sit with? And oh no, what if I’m alone in the corner at morning tea? Or unable to make conversation with someone I’d really like to connect with?

The answer – start to build relationships and develop your professional voice ahead of time. But how? Here’s where the professional networking and discussion program aims to help.

THE IDEA
Basically, we’d like to encourage newbies to the profession and/or newbies to being in the professional online space to establish and build connections, engage in professional conversation and gain a sense of community prior to the symposium.

THE ‘HOW’
Okay, the grand plan is this. A program of professional networking and discussion will stem from the symposium workshop topics. A series of blog posts will provide an overview or viewpoint of the topic area; include details of the related workshops, and link to some resources to get you started with exploring the topics on your own (or with others!) Each ‘hot topic’ will be introduced on Twitter to start off the discussion. This will be followed by a blog post on the topic and some circulation of useful resources.

THE ‘CONVERSATION’
Making connections and facilitation of professional discussion throughout the program will be primarily via Twitter. Participants are encouraged to use both #nls6 and #hottopic hashtags in their tweets for others to follow along.

New to Twitter? No worries. Here are some resources to get you started.

Next, you’ll need people to follow. Building a group of professional LIS folk is simple. Start with a few, either from who you know or from your favourite library blogs, then look to see who they follow. From there, look to see who those people follow, and so on. See any of interest to you? Follow them.

There’s no shortage of Twitter folk willing to help others starting out in the online space. So give it a crack. Start building your professional voice, be involved, and get connected!

 November 30, 2012  Posted by at 11:00 am your nls6 Tagged with: , , , , , ,  No Responses »
Nov 292012
 

Preceding NLS6 is a full day of workshops on Saturday February 9th 2013, covering a wide array of topics, from leadership to research, from copyright to social media, from professional identity to design thinking.

With so many topics, how do you choose? Do yourself a favour and sit down to consider your options rather than leave it crazily until the last minute to make your decision.

Head to the program page of the website. Use the ‘Switch Schedule’ filter to switch from Symposium to Workshops view. There’s six streams of workshops. Click on a session title to find out more about each workshop’s content.

Making choices #1

First up, choose between:

  1. a full day option – now you have narrowed down to two choices; or
  2. two half day options – now you have narrowed to two workshops from a line-up of four (morning) and four (afternoon).

A full day gives you a whole day to explore a topic, bond with the other participants, get practical experience and immerse yourself in topic. By contrast, the half-day workshops give you a chance to try your hand at two completely different topics.

Now you’ve narrowed your choices, it should be easier to make a decision right?

Making choices #2

Reflect on why are you coming to NLS6. Sure, there will be plenty of reasons why you’re joining us, but focus on your core reason.

Are you focused on strengthening your professional identity? Are you coming to expand your technical skills? Are you exploring new ways of looking at social media?

Pick a topic that scares you. Pick a topic that stretches you. Pick a topic that affirms why you do what you.

If you could have any job in the world, which workshop topic(s) would help you achieve it?

Still indecisive?

We didn’t promise to make it easy to choose, because we did promise you that this symposium would Be Different. The workshops will all be awesome. We’ll be showcasing the workshops over the coming weeks, so if you really can’t decide right away, then make sure you stay tuned to find out more.

 November 29, 2012  Posted by at 11:00 am planning, program, your nls6 Tagged with: , , , ,  No Responses »
Nov 222012
 

The NLS6 Committee has been hard at work inviting inspirational speakers to Brisbane, and we’re very pleased to share another keynote with you.

Ingrid Parent is the current president of International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA), beginning her term in August 2011.

Ms Parent is recognized nationally & internationally for her outstanding contributions to libraries and to the library profession. She has been involved with several international information associations including UNESCO, the International Publishers Association, the ISSN International Network, the World Intellectual Property Organization, and the Association of Research Libraries. She has played an active role in developing policies & best practices for libraries, particularly in the areas of resource access and digital activities. In 2009, she received the Canadian Association of Research Libraries (CARL) award for Distinguished Service to Research Librarianship.

Once again NLS6 attendees, you’re invited to follow @ingrid_parent on Twitter, along with our other keynotes.

Ingrid, we’re excited that you’ll be joining Jenica Rogers, Ruth Kneale and Marcus Foth as a keynote speaker at NLS6, and we’re really looking forward to meeting you in Brisbane in February 2013.

 November 22, 2012  Posted by at 11:00 am program Tagged with: , , , ,  No Responses »
Oct 142012
 

Thinking of heading to NLS6 and want to be sure that it is the right place for you? Are you heading to Brisbane from out-of-state or even from overseas (head nod to New Zealand & the Pacific Islands-based folks) and need a good reason to convince people to fund you to attend?

I’ve asked two Kiwi New Librarians’ Symposium attendees about their NLS experiences to give you some inspiration. Hana W is based in Wellington (New Zealand). Kim T is based in Melbourne (Australia). Both attended NLS5 in Perth (2011).

What advantages for new librarians do you see from attending a focussed New Grads events such as NLS?

Kim : NLS feels inclusive. It think it is a valuable symposium and it offers something a bit different from conferences like LIANZA or ALIA which are a bit more mainstream. The good thing is that events like NLS are evolving. They look at new ways of getting people involved, such as offering different ways of presenting.

Hana : A networking opportunity! Meeting new people, meeting colleagues in real life and making new friends at these events is what it’s all about. The primary reason I attend conferences is to catch up with friends and meet new ones, secondary being the actual content and speakers.  Perhaps I’m alone in this admittance, but I’m happy to say it.

Kim : I like that fact that the symposium creates a safe, nurturing space for many of the speakers to present for the first time.

Hana : For NLS in particular, it is more of an unhinged sharing opportunity as your manager isn’t likely to be there and everyone is pretty open and up front.  Most people attending NLS are on a similar wave length to you so discussion and ideas for collaboration are all fairly energetic and positive.

Kim : It’s just great to hang out with a bunch of people who are new to the profession, who offer fresh perspectives, openness and an enthusiasm for the job. There is a lot of peer mentoring that goes on at NLS. It’s possible to meet other people a bit like you, facing similar challenges and form alliances to support each other.

What were your highlights from NLS5?

Kim : My highlights included the keynote from Mal Booth (UTS University Librarian) who talked about design thinking and libraries of the future, and meeting David Lee King from Topeka & Shawnee County Public Library. They were both engaging, forward thinking and inspirational.

Making connections – a.k.a. meeting tweeps in real life (IRL)

Hana : A big highlight was meeting many of the people that I had been communicating with on Twitter for a couple of years, and just hanging out with them all. It felt so good to be connecting with like minded individuals who are all on the same wave length at NLS.  I really enjoy making connections with other LIS professionals and going to NLS was even more like hanging out with a bunch of mates.

Kim : People from my PLN (personal learning network) were attending NLS5 and it was the chance to catch up with them. It was also the opportunity to meet “in real life” people whose blogs I follow or that I follow on Twitter.

But I am not a new graduate …

Kim : I am not a new graduate any longer but NLS5 was a great conference for me to attend as a library manager because I got to hear new graduates talk about their experiences/perceptions of the profession. Many of my new grad friends and colleagues rave about the conference. I expected it to be good and it was.

Hana : Don’t think about the title new graduate! I enjoyed NLS because it is not limited to new graduates. I attended and I don’t yet have a degree or postgraduate library and information qualification but I found it really helpful, and all the content and presentations relevant to me.

What was the most important lesson you took away from NLS?

Kim : Libraries are changing and librarians need to keep learning and evolving to remain relevant. And your professional association needs you!

Hana : Making connections with our friends in Australia is invaluable.

And a last word from Hana …

Hana : For the Kiwis reading this, I’m encouraging you to go to NLS6, as there has been so few New Zealanders attending NLS (we’ve only found two examples so far). Go on guys, it’s fun hanging out with Aussies, I promise. Bridge the gap, lead the way and get into it so more can follow!

Image of Kim T Kim T is a crafter, maker and runner based in Melbourne, Australia. She is the Manager, Hawthorn Campus Library at Swinburne University. She’s @haikugirlOz and an Aurora alumni.

 

 

Image of Hana W

Hana W is based in Wellington, New Zealand. She is a self confessed library geek, as proven by her blog, Library.Geek. She’s @thewhaanga. She’s the former editor of LIANZA’s Library Life.

 October 14, 2012  Posted by at 11:00 am program Tagged with: , , , , ,  No Responses »
Oct 102012
 
Jenica Rogers

With early bird registration now open, we know that you’ll be keen to know more about our NLS6 keynote speakers. In addition to Ruth Kneale and Marcus Foth, please put your hands together (*waves* on Twitter) for… Jenica Rogers, Director of Libraries at the State University of New York at Potsdam, coming from a background in cataloging, collection development, and staff training. Jenica’s already excited to be coming to Australia in 2013, as she enthused on her blog, Attempting Elegance.

We’re thrilled to have Jenica joining us in February 2013, to inspire us and to encourage us to be different. When we asked Jenica what it means to be different, she shared this with us:

I’ve always been fascinated by the firsts of human history and culture, from the mundane to the monumental. I’m just as interested in how we first began cultivating grasses until they became maize as I am in how we put a human into orbit around the Earth as I am in how we figured out that mold could cure disease.

And since I’m so intrigued by those firsts, those changes, those next and new steps, I can’t help but see that those firsts came about because someone decided to try something new. To move against the steady stream of humanity around them. To challenge the status quo. To improve on current reality. To be different.

It’s not easy making those changes and being different; you hold yourself up to your peers, your community, your culture as an object of attention when you flout convention, and that scrutiny isn’t always comfortable. But I think a willingness to be different and to challenge our base assumptions is what allows us to innovate.

I think it’s the root of most of the remarkable things we’ve accomplished.

I think it’s worth the risk.

Jenica, we’re excited that you’ll be joining Ruth Kneale and Marcus Foth as a keynote speaker at NLS6, and we’re looking forward to seeing you in Brisbane in February 2013.

Again, your challenge now folks is to follow all of our keynotes on Twitter (@sunday9pm, @jenica26, @desertlibrarian), read their blogs and think about how you want to share your ‘be different’ enthusiasm.

Jenica Rogers

 October 10, 2012  Posted by at 11:00 am news, program Tagged with: , , , ,  No Responses »
Sep 282012
 

As a student, I struggle with spending time on things I want to do for fun, and things I should do for professional development. Fortunately, some things fit both categories! The New Librarians Symposium is full of fresh ideas, memorable presentations, and people who are doing amazing things in the industry. NLS5 was the first professional library event I attended, so perhaps I’m biased, but it will be difficult for other conferences to live up to my memory of it. I was excited, overwhelmed, and more than a little awed by the sheer number of awesome people in one place.

The banner that greeted me at NLS5A year on, I can barely recall the venue or the food; that’s okay, because that’s not what NLS is about. I made new friends, learned new things, networked, and contributed to the Twitter back channel. The lectures I’d attended at QUT had given me some idea of the breadth of roles available in libraries, but NLS5 made it clear just how limitless my options would be. I was surrounded by real librarians, and their jobs sounded interesting, challenging, and meaningful.

The  2011 keynote speaker lineup was a who’s who in libraryland: Mal Booth, Kate Davis, Kathryn Greenhill, and – all the way from the US – David Lee King. The plenary addresses were given by Sam Hughes, the children’s librarian at WA State Library, and Garry Conroy-Cooper, a man everybody wants to work for. I have come to know and respect these people, and their work, in the past year. What’s so amazing (aside from Sam’s ability to lead a ballroom of adults in a rendition of Twinkle Twinkle) was the immediacy of what the speakers had to say.

Because NLS is a symposium, not a conference, there’s less lead time in submitting and selecting presentations. This means that topics are fresh. Instead of hearing about tired concepts and technology, you can learn what’s hot, right now. And NLS is not strictly for managers, or experienced librarians — it’s for you! You can go home, brimming with enthusiasm, and put those ideas to work.

I attended a workshop prior to the symposium, How to get THE job, and got some great tips. By the close of NLS5, I was feeling so confident and enthusiastic, I asked Steve McQuade if I could come to the State Library of WA and do my practicum. He said yes! Those two weeks were among the best in my two-year journey to becoming a qualified librarian. You never know where the connections you’ll make at NLS will lead.

If the calibre of the speakers at NLS5 is anything to go by, you’ll be blown away at next year’s symposium. Trust me, you don’t want to miss out on all the fun. Go on, be different – at NLS6!

 

Julia Garnett is the 2011 winner of ALIA’s New Generation Advisory Committee (NGAC) competition for free registration to NLS5. She is in her final semester of the LIS program at QUT, and can’t wait to blend her love of technology, books, research, and the community in her first role as a librarian. When she’s not reading on her Kindle, you can catch her singing, blogging, or learning hip hop.

Julia, @jzgarnett

 

 

 September 28, 2012  Posted by at 11:00 am get involved Tagged with: , , ,  No Responses »
Sep 252012
 

Now we’re on a roll to start sharing our excitement about our keynotes, we’d like to introduce you to our second keynote speaker, Ruth Kneale, Systems Librarian and author of You don’t look like a librarian. Ruth is excited to be visiting Australia to share her expertise in embedded librarianship, special libraries, and professional identity. She is also pretty excited to be crowd sourced to be part of NLS6.

We’re thrilled to have Ruth joining us in February 2013, to inspire us and to encourage us to ‘be different’.

Here’s what Ruth had to say when we asked her, what does it mean to you to ‘be different’?

For me, being different means always challenging people’s expectations about what it is to be a librarian – attempting to change the stereotype in any way I can! It also means being proactive, rather than reactive, and never letting someone’s preconceived notions about what a librarian can or can’t do stop me from pushing boundaries.

Check out Ruth’s blog, read her book and follow her on Twitter (you’ll find her online @desertlibrarian), so you can start to think up all the questions you want to ask her.

Ruth, we’re really looking forward to having you join us in February 2013 at NLS6.

 

 September 25, 2012  Posted by at 11:00 am news, program Tagged with: , , , ,  No Responses »